Wills

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will 1

 (wĭl)
n.
1. The mental faculty by which one deliberately chooses or decides upon a course of action: championed freedom of will against a doctrine of predetermination.
2.
a. Diligent purposefulness; determination: an athlete with the will to win.
b. Self-control; self-discipline: lacked the will to overcome the addiction.
3. A desire, purpose, or determination, especially of one in authority: It is the sovereign's will that the prisoner be spared.
4. Deliberate intention or wish: Let it be known that I took this course of action against my will.
5. Free discretion; inclination or pleasure: wandered about, guided only by will.
6. Bearing or attitude toward others; disposition: full of good will.
7.
a. A legal declaration of how a person wishes his or her possessions to be disposed of after death.
b. A legally executed document containing this declaration.
v. willed, will·ing, wills
v.tr.
1.
a. To decide on or intend: He can finish the race if he wills it.
b. To yearn for; desire: "She makes you will your own destruction" (George Bernard Shaw).
c. To decree, dictate, or order: believed that the outcome was willed by the gods.
2. To induce or try to induce by sheer force of will: We willed the sun to come out.
3.
a. To grant in a legal will; bequeath: willed his fortune to charity.
b. To order to direct in a legal will: She willed that her money be given to charity.
v.intr.
1. To exercise the will.
2. To make a choice; choose: Do as you will.
Idiom:
at will
Just as or when one wishes.

[Middle English, from Old English willa; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

will 2

 (wĭl)
aux.v. Past tense would (wo͝od)
1. Used to indicate simple futurity: They will appear later.
2. Used to indicate likelihood or certainty: You will regret this.
3. Used to indicate willingness: Will you help me with this package?
4. Used to indicate requirement or command: You will report to me afterward.
5. Used to indicate intention: I will too if I feel like it.
6. Used to indicate customary or habitual action: People will talk.
7. Used to indicate capacity or ability: This metal will not crack under heavy pressure.
8. Used to indicate probability or expectation: That will be the messenger ringing.
tr. & intr.v.
To wish; desire: Do what you will. Sit here if you will. See Usage Note at shall.

[Middle English willen, to intend to, from Old English willan; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

Wills

 (wĭlz), Helen Newington Also Helen Wills Moo·dy (mo͞o′dē) 1905-1998.
American tennis player who was the dominant woman player in the 1920s and 1930s, winning singles titles in the French Open four times, the US Open seven times, and Wimbledon eight times.

Wills

(wɪlz)
n
1. (Biography) Helen Newington, married name Helen Wills Moody Roark. 1905–98, US tennis player. She was Wimbledon singles champion eight times between 1927 and 1938. She also won the US title seven times and the French title four times
2. (Biography) William John. 1834–61, English explorer: Robert Burke's deputy in an expedition on which both men died after crossing Australia from north to south for the first time