Wilno


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Wilno

(ˈviːlnɔ)
n
(Placename) the Polish name for Vilnius
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Noun1.Wilno - the capital and largest city of LithuaniaWilno - the capital and largest city of Lithuania; located in southeastern Lithuania
Lietuva, Lithuania, Republic of Lithuania - a republic in northeastern Europe on the Baltic Sea
References in periodicals archive ?
Towarzystwo Przyjaciol Nauk w Wilnie, w Wilno i Ziemia Wilenska: zarys monograficzny.
His beloved Wilno, however, about which he has written so movingly in his poetry and in the title essay of Zaczynajc od moich ulic (1990; Eng.
The Wilno area, like other regions of the nation's Russian sector, had undergone total pacification.
Bor-Komorowski was aware that Red Army commanders had arrested Polish officers after accepting their units' help in liberating Wilno (Vilnius) and Lwow (Lviv); nevertheless, he expected Soviet help because Warsaw was the main transport hub between Moscow and Berlin.
In the autumn of 1939, Lithuania attained its long-stated goal of incorporating Wilno (for Lithuanians, Vilnius) as the capital of the Lithuanian state (in all interwar Lithuanian constitutions, Vilnius was consistently mentioned as the capital, with Kaunas merely the "provisional capital").
Like Konwicki, Milosz grew up in the Wilno region, now Lithuania but before World War II a part of Poland's Eastern Borderlands, which were ceded to the Soviet Union in 1944.
His father, Antoni, a graduate of the Polytechnic University at Riga, taught at a technical college in Wilno.
In a book-length interview conducted by Aleksander Fiut, Milosz says: "There were various returns of mine to Wilno even before 1939.
His attitude alternates between wistfulness, developing more strongly the self-mocking theme of nostalgia for the Wilno area of his birth and early upbringing, and a feigned posture of romantic, detached appreciation of the lives and backgrounds of his contemporaries.
21) Jozef Mackiewicz, "Ostroznie z wiadomosciami o Katyniu," Lwow i Wilno no.
The authors include friends, colleagues, students, and translators, and the book follows a roughly chronological order, beginning with those who knew Milosz earliest, such as Elizabeth Kridl Valkeneir--her essay begins with the line "I first knew Czeslaw Milosz when I was a child before World War II" in Wilno (10), and progressing toward the final interview with Robert Hass.
Neither did anyone believe the old woman who, from her vantage point on Ostra Brama's parapet, saw the Russian General Deyov enter the city of Wilno with a regiment of Cossacks; as they swung open the gate, a townsman by the name of Czarnobacki slew Deyov and put the entire regiment to rout.