wimple


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wim·ple

 (wĭm′pəl)
n.
1. A cloth wound around the head, framing the face, and drawn into folds beneath the chin, worn by women in medieval times and as part of the habit of certain orders of nuns.
2.
a. A fold or pleat in cloth.
b. A ripple, as on the surface of water.
c. A curve or bend.
v. wim·pled, wim·pling, wim·ples
v.tr.
1. To cover with or dress in a wimple.
2. To cause to form folds, pleats, or ripples.
v.intr.
1. Archaic To form or lie in folds.
2. To ripple.

[Middle English wimpel, from Old English; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

wimple

(ˈwɪmpəl)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a piece of cloth draped around the head to frame the face, worn by women in the Middle Ages and still a part of the habit of some nuns
2. (Physical Geography) Scot a curve or bend, as in a river
vb
3. rare to ripple or cause to ripple or undulate
4. (Clothing & Fashion) (tr) archaic to cover with or put a wimple on
5. (Clothing & Fashion) archaic (esp of a veil) to lie or cause to lie in folds or pleats
[Old English wimpel; related to Old Saxon wimpal, Middle Dutch wumpel, Middle High German bewimpfen to veil]

wim•ple

(ˈwɪm pəl)

n., v. -pled, -pling. n.
1. a woman's headcloth drawn in folds about the chin, formerly worn out of doors, esp. in the Middle Ages, and still in use by some nuns.
2. Chiefly Scot.
a. a fold or wrinkle, as in cloth.
b. a curve or bend, as in a road or river.
v.t.
3. to cover or muffle with or as if with a wimple.
4. to cause to ripple or undulate, as water.
v.i.
5. to ripple.
6. Chiefly Scot. to follow a curving course, as a road or river.
7. Archaic. to lie in folds, as a veil.
[before 1100; Middle English wimple, wimpel, Old English wimpel, c. Middle Dutch, Middle Low German wimpel, Old High German wimpal, Old Norse vimpill]

wimple


Past participle: wimpled
Gerund: wimpling

Imperative
wimple
wimple
Present
I wimple
you wimple
he/she/it wimples
we wimple
you wimple
they wimple
Preterite
I wimpled
you wimpled
he/she/it wimpled
we wimpled
you wimpled
they wimpled
Present Continuous
I am wimpling
you are wimpling
he/she/it is wimpling
we are wimpling
you are wimpling
they are wimpling
Present Perfect
I have wimpled
you have wimpled
he/she/it has wimpled
we have wimpled
you have wimpled
they have wimpled
Past Continuous
I was wimpling
you were wimpling
he/she/it was wimpling
we were wimpling
you were wimpling
they were wimpling
Past Perfect
I had wimpled
you had wimpled
he/she/it had wimpled
we had wimpled
you had wimpled
they had wimpled
Future
I will wimple
you will wimple
he/she/it will wimple
we will wimple
you will wimple
they will wimple
Future Perfect
I will have wimpled
you will have wimpled
he/she/it will have wimpled
we will have wimpled
you will have wimpled
they will have wimpled
Future Continuous
I will be wimpling
you will be wimpling
he/she/it will be wimpling
we will be wimpling
you will be wimpling
they will be wimpling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wimpling
you have been wimpling
he/she/it has been wimpling
we have been wimpling
you have been wimpling
they have been wimpling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wimpling
you will have been wimpling
he/she/it will have been wimpling
we will have been wimpling
you will have been wimpling
they will have been wimpling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wimpling
you had been wimpling
he/she/it had been wimpling
we had been wimpling
you had been wimpling
they had been wimpling
Conditional
I would wimple
you would wimple
he/she/it would wimple
we would wimple
you would wimple
they would wimple
Past Conditional
I would have wimpled
you would have wimpled
he/she/it would have wimpled
we would have wimpled
you would have wimpled
they would have wimpled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wimple - headdress of cloth; worn over the head and around the neck and ears by medieval women
headdress, headgear - clothing for the head
Translations

wimple

[ˈwɪmpl] Ngriñon m

wimple

nRise f (spec), → Schleier m; (worn by nuns) → (Nonnen)schleier m

wimple

[ˈwɪmpl] nsoggolo
References in classic literature ?
Her long mourning robes and her flowing wimple of black cypress, enhanced the whiteness of her skin, and the beauty of her light-coloured and flowing tresses, which time had neither thinned nor mingled with silver.
Wimple insisted on a particular providence in relation to her stomach complaint, Dr.
Dainty sandals encased her feet, while a wimple of violet silk bordered in gold fringe, lay becomingly over her head and shoulders.
She wasn't your archetypal woman in a wimple - her habit was a trendy taupe colour and she drove a Mini Mayfair at breakneck speed up the school drive - but back at her convent, life was rather more austere.
Owners AmaZing Venues have created 52 luxury bedrooms by knocking the tiny, spartan nun cells into more wimple, sorry ample spaces with mod cons.
She looked like a nun in her black robes and wimple - but as she came nearer, Wesley could see she had pointy-toed shoes, and looked rather medieval.
AFTER starring in Tori R starring in Tori Amos' new musical, The Light Princess, leading lady Laura Pitt-Pulford is now donning a wimple as Maria in The Sound of Music.
I was straight out of the wimple from playing Shelagh Turner in Call The Midwife to no make-up, plus dirt," laughs Laura Main (Rebecca Howlett).
Eventually, the tragic woman was called the 'Madonna of Bentalha' 6 indeed, her look of resignation and melancholy recalls the Madonna of Michelangelo's Pieta sculpture (even the Algerian woman's head-garment is similar to the wimple Mother Mary wears).
In addition 'Lizzie has a history of misunderstandings, but the latest one is bad enough to get her expelled from Our Lady of the Sacred Wimple College.
A '45' bought for 30p at a tabletop sale - Wimple Winch's Save My Soul, recorded in 1966 - is worth pounds 500.