wobbegong


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wobbegong

(ˈwɒbɪˌɡɒŋ)
n
(Animals) an Australian carpet shark, Orectolobus maculatus, with brown-and-white skin
[from a native Australian language]
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Habitat preferences and site fidelity of the ornate wobbegong shark (Orectolobus ornatus) on rocky reefs of New South Wales.
The title belies the contents of this informative book, which features double page spreads on 29 different sharks, including quite a few I hadn't heard of, including the pyjama shark, the broadnose sevengill and the spotted wobbegong.
From the tasselled wobbegong in Indonesia, which looks innocently like a piece of coral as it lays waiting for food, to the mako shark, the fastest in the world - clocked swimming at 46mph.
From the Tassled Wobbegong in Indonesia, which looks innocently like a piece of coral as it lays waiting, to the Mako Shark, the fastest in the world, clocked swimming at 46mph.
From the tasselled wobbegong in Indonesia, which looks innocently like a piece of coral as it lies waiting for food, to the mako shark, the fastest in the world - clocked swimming at 46mph.
A wobbegong The venue has just welcomed a new wobbegong carpet shark and is running a summer-long event up to September 4 to celebrate this master of camouflage.
Also blown to bits are peacock-colored squid--bejeweled with lapis and turquoise because of a symbiotic relationship with bioluminescent bacteria--at the base of massive, centuries-old brain coral; wobbegong sharks, carpeted with tawny tassels and whiskers; olive sea snakes, with lungs instead of gills, peering into my mask then swimming up ninety feet to breathe air; potato cod as big as my sofa; three hundred bigeye trevally drifting in a channel, silvery as mica, resolute as sentries; acres of staghorn coral that give way to seagrass, where a hawksbill turtle rests.
The Wobbegong take is a little less successful and illustrations are somewhat lacking in immediate appeal.
An additional problem with the use of chemical marking techniques, such as with OTC, is that growth may be inhibited (Pfizer, (5) 1975; Monaghan, 1993); however, other researchers that have worked with elasmobranchs have shown OTC to have little adverse effects on growth (Tanaka [1990] for the Japanese Wobbegong [Orectolobus japonicus] and Gelsleichter et al.
The researchers determined that the studied sharks, in this case two wobbegong species, are cone monochromats.
The new shark species include the Black Tip Shark, White Tip Shark, Spotted Bamboo Shark, Coral Cat Shark, Zebra Horned Shark, Wobbegong Shark and Leopard Shark.