Wollstonecraft


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Woll·stone·craft

 (wo͝ol′stən-krăft′, -kräft′), Mary 1759-1797.
British writer and reformer noted for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), which argued for equality of the sexes based on equal ability to exercise reason.

Wollstonecraft

(ˈwʊlstənˌkrɑːft)
n
(Biography) Mary. 1759–97, British feminist and writer, author of A Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792); wife of William Godwin and mother of Mary Shelley

Wollstonecraft

(ˈwʊl stənˌcræft, -krɑft)
n.
1. Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft.
2. Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Wollstonecraft - English writer and early feminist who denied male supremacy and advocated equal education for womenWollstonecraft - English writer and early feminist who denied male supremacy and advocated equal education for women; mother of Mary Shelley (1759-1797)
References in classic literature ?
Shelley himself formed a union with Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, the daughter of his revolutionary teacher.
Wollstonecraft ve arkadaslari kadinin sosyal gelisiminin anahtarinin asamali bir evrimde yattigina inanirlar.
Death and the Maidens: Fanny Wollstonecraft and the Shelley Circle.
These are some of the major figures in women's literature: Mary Wollstonecraft, George Sand and even Toni Morrison--all of whom created ground-breaking works that affected genres.
2) The first wave began in the eighteenth century with women such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Susan B.
The decision to center this work on Wollstonecraft was dictated in part by her relationship to the city where the exhibition is taking place; however, to apply Buckingham's own method, we should also ask: Why Wollstonecraft now?
I believe that Austen likewise drew on Wollstonecraft for Emma.
A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft (1792) - Put forward radical views on feminism for the first time.
In order to be heard, Wollstonecraft, according to Tauchert, is forced to resort to what she calls 'Athenic writing', that is 'writing produced in the name of female-embodied subjects in accordance with a masculinist cultural economy.
The prolific Irish novelist, historian, and playwright combines her whimsical humor with erudition to spin 17 fictional fables based on the lives of real historical figures, whether they're famous (art historian John Ruskin), near-famous (Mary Wollstonecraft, mother of the woman who wrote Frankenstein), or little-known characters such as sideshow dwarves, cross-dressers, and spinsters.
For exposing the "sacred engagement," Godwin was considered an unfeeling husband by friends such as Robert Southey and William Roscoe: Southey accuses Godwin of "stripping his dead wife naked"; Roscoe sees Wollstonecraft as "mourn'd by Godwin with a heart of stone.
In traditional literary history, Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-97) is perhaps best remembered as the mother of Shelley's wife, herself a writer (Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus, 1818).