Woman's Christian Temperance Union


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1.An association of women formed in the United States in 1874, for the advancement of temperance by organizing preventive, educational, evangelistic, social, and legal work. It is also known as the Women's Christian Temperance Union and by its acronym WCTU or W.C.T.U.. It was one of the political forces leading to passage of the constitutional amendment, later repealed, which prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages.
References in periodicals archive ?
He tricked the Woman's Christian Temperance Union into buying his tombstone, he ran a whisky business but never drank, and he was convicted for the murder of his own son.
The Woman's Christian Temperance Union believed that it would protect families, women and children from the ravages of alcohol abuse.
Rudy tells us how the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) was constantly frustrated with its inability to stamp out tobacco sales, and Cook traces the growing acceptability of smoking among young women by the 1940s.
16) Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) made direct requests to WMU for support of temperance issues.
The establishment of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in 1874 serves Davis well as an opening point of reference in her exploration of the inherent tensions between the puritanically motivated advocates of a "dry" America and American Jews' cultural values, political convictions, and economic interests.
Morris Sheppard, Carrie Nation, the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), and Al Capone played instrumental roles.
Reforming Japan; the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in the Meiji period.
In recent years Willard, the president and organizing mastermind of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), has received more scholarly attention as an important figure, especially in the history of woman suffrage and women's oratory.
The Woman's Christian Temperance Union is the oldest continuing nonsectarian women's organization in the world.
FRANCES WILLARD (1839-98) came to faith at a Methodist revival meeting and went on to become president of the 2-million-member Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), which had an evangelistic outreach to laborers of many trades.
They named their confederation the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), though they engaged in a brief debate over whether it was politically wise to include the word "Christian" in the organization's name.
He assumes, for example, in discussing efforts by members of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) in early twentieth-century Montreal (and Quebec Province more generally) to make smoking by minors unlawful, that their motivation was overwhelmingly moral--not allowing good boys and girls to go bad.