Woollcott


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Woollcott

(ˈwʊlkɒt)
n
(Biography) Alexander. 1887–1943, US writer and critic. His collected essays include Shouts and Murmurs (1922)
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Noun1.Woollcott - United States drama critic and journalist (1887-1943)Woollcott - United States drama critic and journalist (1887-1943)
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He brought in talent from Architect Frank Lloyd Wright to choreographer George Balanchine to humorist Alexander Woollcott to teach and inspire his team.
The critic and journalist Alexander Woollcott expressed this in his own inimitable way: All the things I really like to do are illegal, immoral, or fattening.
Alexander Woollcott, Gertrude Lawrence, Noel Coward.
Salah bin Ali Abdulrahman met Australian Permanent Representative Ambassador Peter Woollcott on the sidelines of the high-level 23rd session of the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) and hailed strong relations bonding the Kingdom of Bahrain and Australia.
I think that I absorbed something of it, of the descriptive style of William Sansom and the transatlantic brio of Alexander Woollcott, PM' et origo of Hart and Kaufman's The Man Who Came to Dinner I profited, too, from a very thorough reading of the works of Edmund Wilson.
Alexander Woollcott wrote, "Not Tiny Tim, nor Falstaff, nor Rip Van Winkle, nor any other character wrought in the English tongue seems now a more permanent part of that tongue's heritage than do the high-handed Humpty Dumpty, the wistful Mad Hatter, the somewhat arbitrary Queen of Hearts, the evasive Cheshire Cat, and the gently pathetic White Knight.
Mini Australia, a subsidiary of Bavarian Motor Works AG (Xetra: BMW), has named David Woollcott as the National Manager MINI effective July 1, 2010.
Alexander Woollcott had once arrived unannounced at the Hart's house, took over the place including the master bedroom and terrorised the staff.
Alexander Woollcott (London: Nonesuch Press, 1989).
11) Judges of the Opportunity awards dinner (in which Hurston's Color Struck and "Spunk" were both recognized) included the emminent white playwright Eugene O'Neil and the equally imposing white drama critics Alexander Woollcott and Robert Benchley.
The Algonquin became famous in the 1920s as the meeting place of The Vicious Circle--or Algonquin Round Table--comprising literary worthies such as Dorothy Parker, Alexander Woollcott and Heywood Broun.