etymology

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et·y·mol·o·gy

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. et·y·mol·o·gies
1. The origin and historical development of a linguistic form as shown by determining its basic elements, earliest known use, and changes in form and meaning, tracing its transmission from one language to another, identifying its cognates in other languages, and reconstructing its ancestral form where possible.
2. The branch of linguistics that deals with etymologies.

[Middle English etimologie, from Old French ethimologie, from Medieval Latin ethimologia, from Latin etymologia, from Greek etumologiā : etumon, true sense of a word; see etymon + -logiā, -logy.]

etymology

(ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Linguistics) the study of the sources and development of words and morphemes
2. (Linguistics) an account of the source and development of a word or morpheme
[C14: via Latin from Greek etumologia; see etymon, -logy]
etymological adj
ˌetymoˈlogically adv
ˌetyˈmologist n

et•y•mol•o•gy

(ˌɛt əˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the history of a particular word or element of a word.
2. an account of the origin and development of a word or word element.
3. the study of historical linguistic change, esp. as manifested in individual words.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin etymologia < Greek etymología; see etymon, -logy]
et`y•mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
et`y•mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
et`y•mol′o•gist, n.

etymology

the branch of linguistics that studies the origin and history of words. — etymologist, n. — etymologie, etymological, adj.
See also: Language
the study of the origin and history of individual words. — etymologist, n. — etymological, adj.
See also: Linguistics

etymology

1. The study of the origins and development of words.
2. The study of the history of words, tracing them back to their earliest recorded forms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymology - a history of a word
account, chronicle, history, story - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
folk etymology - a popular but erroneous etymology
2.etymology - the study of the sources and development of words
linguistics - the scientific study of language
lexicostatistics - a statistical technique used in glottochronology; used to estimate how long ago different languages evolved from a common source language

etymology

noun derivation, word history, development of words, history of words, origin of words The etymology of the word 'neon' is the Greek for 'new'.
Translations
etimologia
etymologie
etymologi
etümoloogia
etymologia
etimologija
etimológiaszófejtés
orðsifjafræðiorðsifjar
語源語源学
etymologi
etymologiaźródłosłów
etimologie
etimologija
etymologi

etymology

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] Netimología f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi] n [word] → étymologie f

etymology

nEtymologie f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] netimologia
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