wort

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wort 1

 (wûrt, wôrt)
n.
A plant. Often used in combination: liverwort; milkwort.

[Middle English, from Old English wyrt; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

wort 2

 (wûrt, wôrt)
n.
An infusion of malt that is fermented to make beer.

[Middle English, from Old English wyrt; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

wort

(wɜːt)
n
1. (Botany) (in combination) any of various unrelated plants, esp ones formerly used to cure diseases: liverwort; spleenwort.
2. (Brewing) the sweet liquid obtained from the soaked mixture of warm water and ground malt, used to make a malt liquor
[Old English wyrt root, related to Old High German warz, Gothic waurts root]

wort1

(wɜrt, wɔrt)

n.
the infusion of malt or meal that after fermentation becomes beer or whiskey.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English wyrt, c. Old Saxon wurtja, Middle High German würze spice; akin to wort2]

wort2

(wɜrt, wɔrt)

n.
a plant, herb, or vegetable (now usu. only in combination): figwort.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English wyrt root, plant, c. Old High German wurz, Old Norse urt herb, Gothic waurts root; akin to Old Norse rōt (compare root1), Latin rādīx, Greek rhíza]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wort - usually used in combination: `liverwort'; `milkwort'; `whorlywort'
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
2.wort - unfermented or fermenting malt
malt - a cereal grain (usually barley) that is kiln-dried after having been germinated by soaking in water; used especially in brewing and distilling
Translations
urt
ruohovierreyrtti
vört

wort

nBierwürze f
References in classic literature ?
They sent for some oil of John's wort, and Altisidora herself with her own fair hands bandaged all the wounded parts; and as she did so she said to him in a low voice.
The `effalunt' sat up, looking as much in earnest as any of them, and said soberly to me, "I gif you my wort it is so, if we make too large a noise you shall say Hush
Upon my wort, toctor,” observed Major Hartmann, with a roguish roll of his little black eyes, but with every other feature of his face in a state of perfect rest, “put you have a very pretty pocket-book of tools tere, and your toctor-stuff glitters as if it was petter for ter eyes as for ter pelly.