Wu Ti


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Wu Ti

(ˈwuː ˈtiː)
n
(Biography) See Wu Di
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There were Emperors beloved of literary men, Emperors beloved of the people, builders of long waterways and glittering palaces, and one great conqueror, the Emperor Wu Ti, of almost legendary fame.
For instance, the Chinese idiom for prostration, a submissive pose undertaken to show reverence for buddha, Wu Ti Tou Di had long been defined in Chinese dictionaries as a salute to Buddha requiring hands, knees and head on the ground.
NCB NICKY CLARKE British Hairdresser of the Year Ho WU ti h Winner: 1994 Ultimate timeless hairstyle: "As much as I admire signature looks like Anna Wintour's bob, for me, a freer, movable haircut works better.
Lai CH, Chang TC, Hsueh S, Wu TI, Chao A, Chou HH, et al.
Roedd rhosynnau i'w gweld yng ngerddi imperialaidd yr ymerawdwr Wu Ti dros ddwy fil o flynyddoedd yn ol.
According to this tale, the Han dynasty emperor Wu Ti ordered the bold explorer Zhang Qian to sail up the Yellow River to find out if it really had its source in the Milky Way.
presented to the Chinese court of Wu Ti during the first century of the Former Han (206 B.
Sent into Central Asia with 100 men by the Emperor Wu Ti to negotiate an alliance with the Yueh-chih nation against the Hsiung-nu (or Huns) (139); captured by the Hsiung-nu and held for thirteen years, he went on to continue his mission; returned to China without the desired alliance (126), but his long sojourn in Central Asia made him an expert on the area, and his extensive writings increased Chinese knowledge; served in western China (122-115); commanded a cavalry column of 10,000 against the Hsiung-nu (summer 121), but failed to rendezvous with Li Kuang's force, and so was disgraced and reduced to common rank when Li's force was destroyed; continued to serve as diplomat in embassies to several nomadic tribes until 115; died in 114.
Born into an undistinguished family, Chao entered the army as a young man; won slow, steady promotion in the campaigns against the Hsiung-nu (Huns); as a junior officer, he led a small reliefforce to aid the army of Li Kuangli, whose 30,000 men were surrounded; fought his way through the cordon to Li's army, receiving many wounds (99); his feat so impressed the Emperor Wu Ti that he was promoted to high rank; led several expeditions against the nomad Tangut people in northwest China; later, after being ennobled for his successes, established Chinese military colonies in the area; died in 52.
Born into an aristocratic family, he began his career in the regular Han armies; as a general, served under the Emperor Wu Ti in his campaign against the Hsiung-nu (111); together with Wang Hui, led a column which captured Chu-shih (108); commanded defensive works around Shuo-fang (in the Mu Us Shamo, Inner Mongolia), where he made many improvements (107); captured when his 20,000-man cavalry force was surrounded and destroyed by the Hsiung-nu during a sweep into their territory (autumn 103); escaped from the Hsiung-nu (100), but was not reemployed in any significant capacity.
Intelligent, hardworking, and scholarly, Wu Ti often took the field himself and was an able general; he was an exceptionally talented administrator; he set the pattern for later Chinese governments with a centralized administration staffed with civil servants selected on merit; he was also known for his quick temper, rewarding successful generals but swiftly punishing those who failed, often executing anyone who was particularly unlucky or inept.
260-263); as the Wei themselves weakened, Ssu-ma seized the throne and proclaimed himself Wu Ti, first Emperor of the Chin dynasty (265); after some preparation, he attacked the wealthy kingdom of Wu in southeast China (Sichuan and the Yangtze Valley) and conquered it (280), thus achieving a temporary unification of China; he spent the rest of his reign administering his empire, but his heirs were unable to maintain unity after his death (290).