Wycliffite


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Wycliffite

(ˈwɪklɪˌfaɪt) English history or

Wyclifite

n
(Historical Terms) a follower of John Wycliffe or an adherent of his religious ideas; a Lollard
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to Wycliffe, his followers, or his religious ideas
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include a world astir: Europe and religion in the early 15th century, Wyclif's early reception in Bohemia and his influence on the thought of Jerome of Prague, determinism between Oxford and Prague: the late Wyclif's retractions and their defense ascribed to Peter Payne, interpreting the intention of Christ: Roman responses to Bohemian utraquism from Constance to Basel, preparing for Easter: sermons on the Eucharist in English Wycliffite Sermons, and re-forming the life of Christ.
In the 1395 Prologue to the Wycliffite Bible, where the translators explain in detail their translation project, we can see how carefully they try to foreground "sentence":
Anne Hudson, The Premature Reformation: Wycliffite Texts and Lollard History (New York, 1988), 126.
In the Wycliffite Bible, we find lernen in the Earlier Version corresponding to techen in the Later Version.
Instead of a passive literary onlooker to Wycliffite reform, Chaucer is his fellow theological light.
The Prick of Conscience exists, in one form or another, in more copies than any other piece of medieval English writing except the Wycliffite Bible, in at least 170 manuscripts.
Patrick Hornbeck II, eds, Wycliffite Controversies (Medieval Church Studies, 23), Turnhout, Brepols, 2012; hardback; pp.
The volume is arranged in three main parts: John Wyclif, English Wycliffite Writings, and Heresy Trials.
Moreover when she and, behind her, Chaucer specifically connect her translation to "spiritual illumination" to being "quit fro thennes that most derk is" (66), her words become even more radical because of their potential association with Wycliffite positions (Staley 201).
A more sustained discussion of the implications of the text's manuscript context, as well as its Wycliffite or Lollard associations, would have been welcome.
1520), which was translated from a Wycliffite model, Nisbet's manuscript was kept a closely guarded family secret, and had no influence at large (Law 1901-5).
The salacious religious parody, "The Wycliffite Woman" (translated in the volume in full), in which a prostitute-heretic seduces a young lad, illustrates orthodox anxiety about heresy and the role of literate laywomen within it.