xenoestrogen


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Related to xenoestrogen: antiandrogen

xen·o·es·tro·gen

 (zĕn′ə-ĕs′trə-jĕn, zē′nə-)
n.
Any of various chemical compounds, especially those present in manufactured items or in agrochemical or industrial waste, that imitate natural estrogens and thus disrupt the normal endocrine system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The xenoestrogen bisphenol A induces growth, differentiation, and c-fos gene expression in the female reproductive tract.
Disruption of Parity-Induced Tumor Suppressor Pathways by Xenoestrogen Exposures [website].
Low levels of BPA, however, act additively with xenoestrogen and natural estrogens (Silva, Rajapakse, & Kortenkamp, 2002; Soto, Chung, & Sonnenschein, 1994; Soto, Fernandez, Luizzi, Oles Karasko, & Sonnenschein, 1997; Tollefesen, 2002).
Increased oviposition with increasing sources of xenoestrogen source is a logical trend given the estrogenic effects of these compounds in living organisms.
BPA is a xenoestrogen, a man-made compound that has estrogenic effects.
4) More specifically, BPA is a xenoestrogen, which mimics the relative bioactivity of estrogen.
Cancers specific to female reproductive organs such as the breast, uterus and ovary, are associated with higher long-term exposure to oestrogen, and numerous studies have shown that environmental xenoestrogen presence and exposure is higher in urban areas.
The principal metabolite derived from DDT is called DDE, a xenoestrogen that lingers in fat deposits in the human body for decades.
The xenoestrogen peril is not yet front-page news, but it would come as no surprise to Rachel Carson, the early environmentalist who in 1962 first pointed an accusing finger at DDT.
SS: A xenoestrogen is like the molecule of estrogen we have floating around in our body--normally it attaches to an estrogen receptor site.