horseshoe crab

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horseshoe crab

n.
Any of various marine arthropods of the order Xiphosurida, especially Limulus polyphemus of eastern North America, having a large rounded body and a stiff pointed tail. Also called king crab, limulus.

horseshoe crab

n
(Animals) any marine chelicerate arthropod of the genus Limulus, of North America and Asia, having a rounded heavily armoured body with a long pointed tail: class Merostomata. Also called: king crab

horse′shoe crab′


n.
any of several large marine arthropods of the order Xiphosura, esp. Limulus polyphemus, of E North American shores, having a stiff tail and brown carapace curved like a horseshoe. Also called king crab.
[1765–75]

horse·shoe crab

(hôrs′sho͞o′)
Any of various marine arthropods that have a large rounded shell that covers the body, two large compound eyes on the shell, and a stiff pointed tail. Horseshoe crabs are not in fact crabs, but belong to an ancient order of arthropods related to the spiders and extinct trilobites.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.horseshoe crab - large marine arthropod of the Atlantic coast of North America having a domed carapace that is shaped like a horseshoe and a stiff pointed tailhorseshoe crab - large marine arthropod of the Atlantic coast of North America having a domed carapace that is shaped like a horseshoe and a stiff pointed tail; a living fossil related to the wood louse
arthropod - invertebrate having jointed limbs and a segmented body with an exoskeleton made of chitin
genus Limulus, Limulus - type genus of the family Limulidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Autecology of Silurian Xiphosurida, Scorpionida, and Phyllocarida Special Papers in Palaeontology 32: 27-37.
Ancestral horseshoe crabs (Class Merostomata, Order Xiphosurida, Suborder Synziphosurina), often found associated with eurypterids in Silurian and Devonian strata, are sporadically represented in the geologic column (Stormer, 1955).
Phylogenetic and macroevolutionary patterns within the Xiphosurida.