Y chromosome


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Y chromosome

or Y-chro·mo·some (wī′krō′mə-sōm′)
n.
The sex chromosome associated with male characteristics in mammals, not occurring in females and occurring with one X chromosome in the male sex-chromosome pair.

Y chromosome



n.
a sex chromosome of humans and most mammals that is present only in males and is paired with an Xchromosome. Compare X chromosome.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Y chromosome - the sex chromosome that is carried by men; "human males normally have one X chromosome and one Y chromosome"
sex chromosome - (genetics) a chromosome that determines the sex of an individual; "mammals normally have two sex chromosomes"
References in periodicals archive ?
Some mammals have already lost their Y chromosome, though they still have males and females and reproduce normally.
About 310 million years ago, there was no Y chromosome as we know it.
Scientists have also begun to study patterns in the non-recombining region of the paternally inherited Y chromosome as an alternative source of evidence to complement the maternal mtDNA findings.
In June, Forsberg's team reported linking Y chromosome loss to a higher risk of several types of cancer and a decreased life span in a smaller group of men.
Proponents of the so-called rotting Y theory have been predicting the eventual extinction of the Y chromosome since it was first discovered that the Y has lost hundreds of genes over the past 300 million years.
I think anybody who knows the biblical story about Aaron and this tradition of the priesthood going from father to son, and is aware that the Y chromosome is inherited in the same way, would think of this question,'' said Dr.
Deborah Charlesworth of the University of Edinburgh says, "It is not rash to call this a Y chromosome or at least an evolving Y.
As a result, a man should have a carbon copy of the Y chromosome of his father, grandfather and so on.
The Y chromosome data generate a more precise estimate of colonization of the Americas than earlier DNA studies provided, the researchers contend.