Yankee


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Related to Yankee: Yankee Doodle

Yan·kee

 (yăng′kē)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of New England, especially one of English descent.
2. A native or inhabitant of a northern US state, especially a Union soldier during the Civil War.
3. A native or inhabitant of the United States.

[Origin unknown.]
Word History: The first known attestation of the word Yankee is found in a letter from 1758 by General James Wolfe—he used it as a term of contempt for the American colonial troops in his command. The song Yankee Doodle, which in early versions was sung by British troops to mock colonial Americans, originally used Yankee in this way: Yankee Doodle came to town / For to buy a firelock / We will tar and feather him / And so we will John Hancock. However, colonial American soldiers turned the derisive epithet around and adopted it as a term of national pride. Many theories of the origin of this term Yankee have been advanced over the years. People already wondered about the word in 1809, when Washington Irving wrote a humorous explanation of the word as coming from a term that "in the Tchusaeg (or Massachusett) language signifies silent men." More serious proposals of a Native American origin of the word have also been made. Some have suggested, for example, that Yankee derives from the pronunciation of the English word English in one of the languages of the Native Americans. However, no form resembling Yankee has been found in records of any Native American language. According to what is perhaps the most popular theory of the origin of Yankee, it comes from Dutch Janke or Janneke, which are variants of Jantje, "Johnnie," the diminutive of Jan, the Dutch equivalent of the English name John. In this theory, Janke or Janneke would have originally been used in English as a nickname for Dutch settlers living along the Hudson River and then later extended to New Englanders. This theory finds some support in the application of the term Yanky, perhaps as a nickname, to a certain Dutch pirate active in the Caribbean in the 1680s. According to yet another theory, Yankee originated as a nickname or informal term for a Dutch person deriving from Jan Kees, a compound name made up of Jan and the common Dutch name Kees, short for Cornelius. Ultimately, however, there is not enough evidence to confirm any of these theories, and the origin of Yankee remains unknown.

Yankee

(ˈjæŋkɪ) or informal

Yank

n
1. (Peoples) often derogatory a native or inhabitant of the US; American
2. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of New England
3. (Historical Terms) a native or inhabitant of the Northern US, esp a Northern soldier in the Civil War
4. (Telecommunications) communications a code word for the letter y
5. (Banking & Finance) finance a bond issued in the US by a foreign borrower
adj
of, relating to, or characteristic of Yankees
[C18: perhaps from Dutch Jan Kees John Cheese, nickname used derisively by Dutch settlers in New York to designate English colonists in Connecticut]

Yan•kee

(ˈyæŋ ki)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of the United States.
2. a native or inhabitant of New England.
3. a native or inhabitant of a Northern state.
4. a Federal soldier in the Civil War.
adj.
5. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a Yankee or Yankees: Yankee ingenuity.
[1750–60, Amer.; perhaps back formation from Dutch Jan Kees John Cheese (taken as pl.), nickname applied by the Dutch of colonial New York to English settlers in Connecticut]
Yan′kee•dom, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Yankee - an American who lives in the North (especially during the American Civil War)
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
North - the region of the United States lying to the north of the Mason-Dixon line
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
Federal, Federal soldier, Union soldier - a member of the Union Army during the American Civil War
2.Yankee - an American who lives in New England
New England - a region of northeastern United States comprising Maine and New Hampshire and Vermont and Massachusetts and Rhode Island and Connecticut
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
3.Yankee - an American (especially to non-Americans)
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
Adj.1.Yankee - used by Southerners for an inhabitant of a northern state in the United States (especially a Union soldier)
northern - in or characteristic of a region of the United States north of (approximately) the Mason-Dixon line; "Northern liberals"; "northern industry"; "northern cities"
Translations
كَلِمَة أكثر عاطفيَّة تعني: أمريكي
Yankee
yankee
Igrekjänki
jenkkiYrjö
Bandaríkjamaîur, Kani
ianque
obyvateľ severu USAYankee

Yankee

[ˈjæŋkɪ]
A. ADJyanqui
B. Nyanqui mf
YANKEE
Aunque en los demás países se utiliza el término Yankee para referirse a los estadounidenses en general, en Estados Unidos un Yankee es un habitante de un estado del norte, sobre todo para los sureños, ya que en el norte se dice que un verdadero Yankee es el oriundo de Nueva Inglaterra. La primera vez que se utilizó fue en la canción Yankee Doodle, escrita por un inglés para burlarse de los colonos americanos. Sin embargo, durante la revolución americana, los soldados del general Washington transformaron la canción de insulto en himno patriótico. Desde la guerra de Secesión los sureños han intentado distinguirse de los norteños llamándoles Yankees. Los británicos usan el término peyorativo Yank para referirse a los estadounidenses.

Yankee

[ˈjæŋki] n
(mainly US) (= person from northern US) habitant du Nord des États-Unis d'Amérique
(British) (pejorative)Yankee mf , Amerloque mf , Ricain(e) m/f

Yankee

(inf)
nYankee m (inf); (Hist also) → Nordstaatler(in) m(f)
adj attrYankee- (inf)

Yank

(jӕŋk) noun
an impolite word for a person from the United States of America.
Yankee (ˈjӕŋki) noun, adjective
1. a more affectionate word for (an) American.
2. (used by Americans from the southern states of the USA) an American from the northern states.
References in classic literature ?
Months afterward we got a card from Otto, saying that Jake had been down with mountain fever, but now they were both working in the Yankee Girl Mine, and were doing well.
The little boy had the cent ready, but, like a true-born Yankee, would have preferred the better bargain to the worse.
Nor must we forget the captains of the rusty little schooners that bring firewood from the British provinces; a rough-looking set of tarpaulins, without the alertness of the Yankee aspect, but contributing an item of no slight importance to our decaying trade.
Well, seeing I'm in the hands of a Yankee, there is nothing for it but to concede;" and St.
So I am a Yankee of the Yankees -- and practical; yes, and nearly barren of sentiment, I suppose -- or poetry, in other words.
Abijah Flagg was summoned, lifted the well cover, explored, found the inciting cause of trouble, and with the help of Yankee wit succeeded in removing it.
Wyeth and a band of "down-easters" Yankee enterprise Fitzpatrick His adventure with the Blackfeet A rendezvous of mountaineers The battle of Pierre's Hole An Indian ambuscade Sublette's return
This renders us strictly Yankee in our origin, an extraction of which I find all who enjoy it fond of boasting.
Beats all these tales we hear about murders in Yankee ships.
The Mut'ny, think o' that; the Mut'ny an' some dirty little matters in Afghanistan; an' for that an' these an' those" - Dan pointed to the names of glorious battles - "that Yankee man with the partin' in his hair comes an' says as easy as 'have a drink' .
He has registered a vow: he will fill his vessel with good sperm oil, or failing to do so, never again strike Yankee soundings.
He was very poor company, himself, and even his acute preoccupation and his general lack of the habit of pondering the impression he produced did not prevent him from reflecting that his companions must be puzzled to see how poor Bellegarde came to take such a fancy to this taciturn Yankee that he must needs have him at his death-bed.