Yiddish


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Yid·dish

 (yĭd′ĭsh)
n.
The language historically of Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, resulting from a fusion of elements derived principally from medieval German dialects and secondarily from Hebrew and Aramaic, various Slavic languages, and Old French and Old Italian.

[Yiddish yidish, Jewish, Yiddish, from Middle High German jüdisch, Jewish, from jude, jüde, Jew, from Old High German judo, from Latin Iūdaeus; see Jew.]

Yid′dish adj.

Yiddish

(ˈjɪdɪʃ)
n
(Languages) a language spoken as a vernacular by Jews in Europe and elsewhere by Jewish emigrants, usually written in the Hebrew alphabet. Historically, it is a dialect of High German with an admixture of words of Hebrew, Romance, and Slavonic origin, developed in central and E Europe during the Middle Ages
adj
(Languages) in or relating to this language
[C19: from German jüdisch, from Jude Jew]

Yid•dish

(ˈyɪd ɪʃ)

n.
1. a language of central and E European Jews and their descendants elsewhere: based on Rhenish dialects of Middle High German with an admixture of vocabulary from Hebrew and Aramaic, the Slavic languages, and other sources, and written in the Hebrew alphabet.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Yiddish.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other wordsYiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a devious trick; a bit of cheating; "how did you ever fall for a shtik like that?"
pisha paysha - (Yiddish) a card game for two players one of whom is usually a child; the deck is place face down with one card face upward; players draw from the deck alternately hoping to build up or down from the open card; the player with the fewest cards when the deck is exhausted is the winner
meshugaas, mishegaas, mishegoss - (Yiddish) craziness; senseless behavior or activity
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a prank or piece of clowning; "his shtik made us laugh"
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a contrived and often used bit of business that a performer uses to steal attention; "play it straight with no shtik"
tsuris - (Yiddish) aggravating trouble; "the frustrating tsuris he subjected himself to"
chachka, tchotchke, tsatske, tshatshke - (Yiddish) an inexpensive showy trinket
schmaltz, schmalz, shmaltz - (Yiddish) excessive sentimentality in art or music
chutzpa, chutzpah, hutzpah - (Yiddish) unbelievable gall; insolence; audacity
schmegegge, shmegegge - (Yiddish) baloney; hot air; nonsense
German language, High German, German - the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic
shmooze - (Yiddish) a warm heart-to-heart talk
kvetch - (Yiddish) a nagging complaint
megillah - (Yiddish) a long boring tediously detailed account; "he insisted on giving us the whole megillah"
tsoris - (Yiddish) trouble and suffering
nosh - (Yiddish) a snack or light meal
knish - (Yiddish) a baked or fried turnover filled with potato or meat or cheese; often eaten as a snack
bagel, beigel - (Yiddish) glazed yeast-raised doughnut-shaped roll with hard crust
mishpachah, mishpocha - (Yiddish) the entire family network of relatives by blood or marriage (and sometimes close friends); "she invited the whole mishpocha"
schmear, schmeer, shmear - (Yiddish) a batch of things that go together; "he bought the whole schmeer"
chachka, tchotchke, tchotchkeleh, tsatske, tshatshke - (Yiddish) an attractive, unconventional woman
chutzpanik - (Yiddish) a person characterized by chutzpa
ganef, ganof, gonif, goniff - (Yiddish) a thief or dishonest person or scoundrel (often used as a general term of abuse)
kibitzer - (Yiddish) a meddler who offers unwanted advice to others
klutz - (Yiddish) a clumsy dolt
knocker - (Yiddish) a big shot who knows it and acts that way; a boastful immoderate person
kvetch - (Yiddish) a constant complainer
mensch, mensh - a decent responsible person with admirable characteristics
meshuggeneh, meshuggener - (Yiddish) a crazy fool
nebbech, nebbish - (Yiddish) a timid unfortunate simpleton
nudnick, nudnik - (Yiddish) someone who is a boring pest
putz - (Yiddish) a fool; an idiot
schlemiel, shlemiel - (Yiddish) a dolt who is a habitual bungler
schlep, schlepper, shlep, shlepper - (Yiddish) an awkward and stupid person
schlimazel, shlimazel - (Yiddish) a very unlucky or inept person who fails at everything
schmo, schmuck, shmo, shmuck - (Yiddish) a jerk
schnook, shnook - (Yiddish) a gullible simpleton more to be pitied than despised; "don't be such an apologetic shnook"
schnorrer, shnorrer - (Yiddish) a scrounger who takes advantage of the generosity of others
shegetz - an offensive term for non-Jewish young man; "why does she like all those shkotzim?"
shiksa, shikse - a derogatory term used by Jews to refer to non-Jewish women
yenta - (Yiddish) a woman who talks too much; a gossip unable to keep a secret; a woman who spreads rumors and scandal
yenta - (Yiddish) a vulgar shrew; a shallow coarse termagant
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a little; a piece; "give him a shtik cake"; "he's a shtik crazy"; "he played a shtik Beethoven"
schemozzle, shemozzle - (Yiddish) a confused situation or affair; a mess
Translations
jidiš
jiddisch
yiddishyidiche
jiddischjiddisk
Idiş
Jiddisch

Yiddish

[ˈjɪdɪʃ]
A. ADJjudío
B. N (Ling) → yíd(d)ish m, judeo-alemán m

Yiddish

[ˈjɪdɪʃ]
n (= language) → yiddish m
adjyiddish inv

Yiddish

adjjiddisch
n (Ling) → Jiddisch nt

Yiddish

[ˈjɪdɪʃ] adj & nyiddish (m) inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: An impressively written, organized and presented work of remarkably detailed research, "Survivors and Exiles: Yiddish Culture after the Holocaust" is a truly seminal work of exceptional scholarship.
It is likely another example of the common transition that occurs with the Americanization of Yiddish.
Lansky, author of "Outwitting History: The Amazing Adventures of a Man Who Rescued a Million Yiddish Books,'' will describe how rescued Yiddish books and recordings are being made accessible through digitalization and translation, and how a new generation is discovering these treasures.
Indeed, as Abigail Wood's monograph convincingly argues in some detail, Yiddish song and the singing thereof act as a kind of cultural linchpin for a community of contemporary Yiddishists that is centered in New York but stretches across North America and reaches over the Atlantic back to Europe.
For the ninth consecutive summer, under the musical direction of world-renown maestro Zalmen Mlotek, The Folksbiene will present a vibrant original concert, headlined by some of the most in-demand talent of the rising generation of Yiddish performers.
After tragically losing both his mother and wife during the Holocaust, he emerged as one of the most prolific and defining Yiddish voices in post-war literature.
The content of the first part examines the issue of endangered language as it applies to Yiddish in Melbourne, noting its relatively rapid growth then decline as a typical mass migration phenomenon and investigates reasons for that decline.
But keep in mind that The Times is also a national journal mad there does not appear to be any explanation for the Yiddish in the national edition.
De langue juive immigrante, Le yiddish est devenu ethnique et patrimonial dans un contexte de multiculturalisme canadien.
Moreover, the discovery and documentation of survivors in their eighties or nineties, some of whom were the last speakers of Yiddish in their towns or regions, represented an eleventh hour opportunity not only for Yiddish dialectology, but a project of potentially wider methodological interest for determining recoverability of the geolinguistic makeup of vanished societies.
Beginning early in the twentieth century, however, more sophisticated Christian materials began to find their way into Yiddish.
At the turn of the twentieth century, some forty years after the establishment of the first professional Yiddish theater troupe, Jewish playwrights and directors began to introduce the plots, characters, and dramatic motifs of ancient Greek tragedy onto the modern Yiddish stage.