Yiddisher

Yiddisher

(ˈjɪdɪʃə)
adj
1. (Languages) in or relating to Yiddish
2. (Peoples) Jewish
3. (Judaism) Jewish
n
4. (Languages) a speaker of Yiddish; Jew
5. (Peoples) a speaker of Yiddish; Jew
6. (Judaism) a speaker of Yiddish; Jew
References in periodicals archive ?
The membership of "The Ten" overlapped that of the other organizations, some Jewish, some not: Louis Lozowick and Ben-Zion (Benzion Weinman) were members of the Yiddisher Kultur Farband (Jewish Culture Association, YKUF), for example, and all the artists belonged to the American Artists' Congress.
Additionally, in a separate deal on the same day, we announced the buy-out of a catalogue of 100 traditional Yiddisher songs and a spoken word performance of the classic tale of Peter Pan.
This troupe was succeeded by another headed by Elias Geltman, the Dramatishe Sekzie of the Yiddisher Kultur Tsenter, and during 1924-25 it performed seven Yiddish plays.
Due, I think, to displaying such a keen interest in him, he would call me 'the boy with a Yiddisher Kopf' (shrewd mind).
Saul Bellow's character Humboldt, a temporary faculty member at Princeton in the early 1950s, speaks no German, and sees himself as "a Yiddisher mouse in these great Christian houses.
The purest manifestation of authentic secular Judaism was the General Jewish Workers Union in Lithuania, Poland and Russia (in the Yiddish original Algemeyner Yiddisher Arbeter Bund in Lita, Poyln, un Rusland.
I've always maintained that those damned Yiddisher banks would be the end of us
Two Yiddisher chaps are having chopped liver in a New York restaurant.
Perhaps the best known today is "Bankrupt," Hayim Greenberg's fiery J'Accuse in the February 12, 1943, edition of the Yiddish periodical Yiddisher Kemfer.
in 1925, a creation of the Yiddisher Arbeter Froyen Farein, established
The movie was A Yiddisher Boy and the hero was seen in a childhood street fight 25 years earlier.
A Cockney wide-boy with a Yiddisher momma straight out of Carry On Fiddling On The Roof (Jane Lapotaire hamming hysterically), yet with an accent that was more Jarrow than Jewish.