Yinglish

Yinglish

(ˈjɪŋɡlɪʃ)
n
(Languages) a dialect of English spoken esp by Jewish immigrants to New York, and heavily influenced by Yiddish constructions and loan words. Also: Yenglish
[from Yi(ddish) + (E)nglish]
References in periodicals archive ?
The relatives kept the specter of loneliness at bay by bringing with them their Jewishness as embodied in theft interests, their points of view, their stresses, their styles, all expressed in the tserbrokhene language of Yinglish.
This has produced Spanglish, a hybrid familiar to Americans, especially those who reside in Latin American immigration centers, and also Chinglish in Hong Kong, Singlish in Singapore, Yorlish among Yoruba-speakers in Lagos, Nigeria, and Yinglish among Yiddish-speaking immigrants in the United States and the United Kingdom.
Finally, to understand what New Yorkers are talking about (tawkinabow), any newcomer unfamiliar with Basic Yinglish will need to take a crash course to grasp such classic locutions as shlep (to lug, carry), kvetch (complain, whine), shmuck (a dope, jerk, in Yiddish a penis), shmeer (to spread or a spread), and oy (an untranslatable exclamation that Leo Rosten describes as not a word but a vocabulary).
In between those two bookends, the connected stories are peopled with a procession of characters ranging from Aunt Gerty and her husband-to-be Big Red, mob connected and Jewishly illiterate; mingled with them are Braverman the choir director, the neighborhood kids, the memory of father's doomed family in Poland, the ubiquity of ritual, synagogue, and Talmud, affianced to Hebrew, Yinglish, and the polyglot culture of New York before and after World War II.
A joke about the intricacies of Yiddish or Yinglish (a hybrid of Yiddish and English) can be interspersed with the performer's tender rendition of a Yiddish lullaby, ``Oyfn Veg Shteyt A Boym.
Recreating song and comedy routines from the golden age of Jewish vaudeville, he translates them into a delightful mix of English, Yiddish and Yinglish.
16) For Donald Weber, "Katz's Yinglish art provided a space of subculture identification, perhaps even a mode of parodic defense or (at least) temporary resistance against the forces of acculturation.
3] Like Yinglish, it was designed as an escape, a fictional construct in which they could be both Jews and Americans.
So I explained to him that dohnt esk, is Yinglish for freg nisht, which morphed into the commonly used American English expression "don't ask," meaning "What's the sense of asking?
The secularists refer to culinary matters, the joys of lox and bagels, of knishes and kugel, and a smidgen of Yinglish and Hebronics.
With its characteristic Yinglish syntax, this last remark represents the older generation's bemusement with the military parade.
Judging by his disgust at a Jewish singer who "could not pronounce English words" and who "sang through his nose," we can only imagine what his reaction would have been to the sound of Katz's Yinglish transformations of Rossini's The Barber of Seville into the klezmer pop opera of "The Barber of Schlemiel," Bizet's Carmen into the tragic Jewish heroine "Carmen Katz," and the patriotic national march of "Bugle Call Rag" into the deli counter klezmer jazz clowning of "Bagel Call Rag.