Yom Kippur


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Yom Kip·pur

 (yôm′ kĭp′ər, yōm′, yŏm′, yôm′ kē-po͝or′)
n. Judaism
A holy day observed on the tenth day of Tishri and marked by fasting and prayer for the atonement of sins. Also called Day of Atonement.

[Hebrew yôm kippûr : yôm, day; see ywm in Semitic roots + kippûr, atonement (from kippēr, to cover, atone; see kpr in Semitic roots).]

Yom Kippur

(jɒm ˈkɪpə; Hebrew jɔm kiˈpur)
n
(Judaism) an annual Jewish holiday celebrated on Tishri 10 as a day of fasting, on which prayers of penitence are recited in the synagogue throughout the day. Also called: Day of Atonement
[from Hebrew, from yōm day + kippūr atonement]

Yom Kip•pur

(yɒm ˈkɪp ər, yoʊm; Heb. ˈyɔm kiˈpur)
n.
the holiest Jewish holiday, observed on the 10th day of Tishri by fasting and by recitation of prayers of repentance in the synagogue. Also called Day of Atonement.
[< Hebrew, =yōm day + kippūr atonement]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Yom Kippur - (Judaism) a solemn and major fast day on the Jewish calendar; 10th of Tishri; its observance is one of the requirements of the Mosaic law
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
major fast day - one of two major fast days on the Jewish calendar
High Holiday, High Holy Day - Jewish holy days observed with particular solemnity
Translations

Yom Kippur

[ˌjɒmkɪˈpʊəʳ] NYom Kip(p)ur m

Yom Kippur

[ˌjɒmkɪˈpʊər] nYom Kippour m inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Except that last Friday night, in the show as well as on real life, was the eve of Yom Kippur, and a good Rubinstein was more likely to be in shul hearing kol nidre than at home roasting a Cornish hen.
Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the Jewish year and is also considered the most important holiday in the Jewish faith.
HAIFA, September 28, 2017 (WAFA) -- In an unprecedented move, Israel said it will allow the Arabic-language Hala television network to broadcast on Yom Kippur, a Jewish holiday when Israeli Hebrew-language television stations go off the air for 24 hours, in accordance with Israeli state broadcasting regulations, the Haifa-based Adalah -- The Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel said on Thursday.
Jerusalem District Commander Moshe Edri on Monday evening announced that the entry of Muslims to the Temple Mount compound will be restricted in the coming days, in light of the ongoing violence in the area and in the wake of intelligence received that Arab youths intend to cause disturbances during the Yom Kippur holiday.
Israeli authorities decided to enforce a complete closure on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip during the Yom Kippur holiday, also known as the Day of Atonement.
Gorgeous, full-color photography illuminates The Holiday Kosher Baker: Traditional & Contemporary Holiday Desserts, a cookbook created especially to help home bakers create traditional, kosher delicacies especially for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur (desserts to eat after Yom Kippur ends), Sukkot, Chanukah, Purim, Passover, and Shavuot.
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On Yom Kippur eve, sacred to the Jewish people, the Iranian tyrant chose to call publicly before all of the world for us to vanish.
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GAZA, September 25 (KUNA) -- Israel elevated the alert status among its police forces on the occasion of Yom Kippur, or Day of Atonement, and will continue to do so over the next 10 days.
The film tells how the Kol Nidre, a prayer chanted at the beginning of the Yom Kippur holiday, caused centuries of persecution but also how it became a Jewish anthem.
In 13 papers from a conference held in Mainz, Germany in July 2010, scholars from Europe and the US discuss the foundation of Yom Kippur in Leviticus and its reception in Early Judaism, the New Testament, Early Christianity, and Jewish liturgy.