York


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Related to York: York University

York 1

 (yôrk)
Ruling house of England that from 1461 to 1485 produced three kings of England—Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III. During the Wars of the Roses its symbol was a white rose.

York′ist adj. & n.

York 2

 (yôrk)
1. A city of northern England on the Ouse River northeast of Leeds. Originally a Celtic settlement, it was later held by Romans, Angles, Danes, and Normans.
2. A city of southern Pennsylvania south-southeast of Harrisburg. Settled in 1735, it was the meeting place of the Continental Congress in 1777-1778 during the British occupation of Philadelphia.

york

(jɔːk)
vb
(Cricket) (tr) cricket to bowl or try to bowl (a batsman) by pitching the ball under or just beyond the bat
[C19: back formation from yorker]

York

(jɔːk)
n
1. (Placename) a historic city in NE England, in York unitary authority, North Yorkshire, on the River Ouse: the military capital of Roman Britain; capital of the N archiepiscopal province of Britain since 625, with a cathedral (the Minster) begun in 1154; noted for its cycle of medieval mystery plays; unusually intact medieval walls; university (1963). Pop: 137 505 (2001). Latin name: Eboracum
2. (Placename) a unitary authority in NE England, in North Yorkshire. Pop: 183 100 (2003 est). Area: 272 sq km (105 sq miles)
3. (Placename) Cape York a cape in NE Australia, in Queensland at the N tip of the Cape York Peninsula, extending into the Torres Strait: the northernmost point of Australia

York

(jɔːk)
n
1. (Biography) the English royal house that reigned from 1461 to 1485 and was descended from Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (1411–60), whose claim to the throne precipitated the Wars of the Roses. His sons reigned as Edward IV and Richard III
2. (Biography) Alvin C(ullum). 1887–1964, US soldier and hero of World War I
3. (Biography) Duke of, full name Prince Frederick Augustus, Duke of York and Albany. 1763–1827, second son of George III of Great Britain and Ireland. An undistinguished commander-in-chief of the British army (1798–1809), he is the "grand old Duke of York" of the nursery rhyme
4. (Biography) Prince Andrew, Duke of. born 1960, second son of Elizabeth II of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He married (1986) Miss Sarah Ferguson; they divorced in 1996; their first daughter, Princess Beatrice of York, was born in 1988 and their second, Princess Eugenie of York, in 1990

York

(yɔrk)

n.
1. a member of the royal house of England that ruled from 1461 to 1485.
2. 1st Duke of (Edmund of Langley), 1341–1402, progenitor of the house of York (son of Edward III).
3. Alvin Cullum (Sergeant), 1887–1964, U.S. soldier.
5. Ancient, Eboracum. a city in North Yorkshire, in NE England, on the Ouse: the capital of Roman Britain. 104,000.
6. a city in SE Pennsylvania: meeting of the Continental Congress 1777–78. 44,619.
7. an estuary in E Virginia, flowing SE into Chesapeake Bay. 40 mi. (64 km) long.
8. Cape, a cape at the NE extremity of Australia.

york


Past participle: yorked
Gerund: yorking

Imperative
york
york
Present
I york
you york
he/she/it yorks
we york
you york
they york
Preterite
I yorked
you yorked
he/she/it yorked
we yorked
you yorked
they yorked
Present Continuous
I am yorking
you are yorking
he/she/it is yorking
we are yorking
you are yorking
they are yorking
Present Perfect
I have yorked
you have yorked
he/she/it has yorked
we have yorked
you have yorked
they have yorked
Past Continuous
I was yorking
you were yorking
he/she/it was yorking
we were yorking
you were yorking
they were yorking
Past Perfect
I had yorked
you had yorked
he/she/it had yorked
we had yorked
you had yorked
they had yorked
Future
I will york
you will york
he/she/it will york
we will york
you will york
they will york
Future Perfect
I will have yorked
you will have yorked
he/she/it will have yorked
we will have yorked
you will have yorked
they will have yorked
Future Continuous
I will be yorking
you will be yorking
he/she/it will be yorking
we will be yorking
you will be yorking
they will be yorking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been yorking
you have been yorking
he/she/it has been yorking
we have been yorking
you have been yorking
they have been yorking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been yorking
you will have been yorking
he/she/it will have been yorking
we will have been yorking
you will have been yorking
they will have been yorking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been yorking
you had been yorking
he/she/it had been yorking
we had been yorking
you had been yorking
they had been yorking
Conditional
I would york
you would york
he/she/it would york
we would york
you would york
they would york
Past Conditional
I would have yorked
you would have yorked
he/she/it would have yorked
we would have yorked
you would have yorked
they would have yorked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.York - the English royal house (a branch of the Plantagenet line) that reigned from 1461 to 1485; its emblem was a white rose
dynasty - a sequence of powerful leaders in the same family
royal family, royal house, royal line, royalty - royal persons collectively; "the wedding was attended by royalty"
Richard III - King of England from 1483 to 1485; seized the throne from his nephew Edward V who was confined to the Tower of London and murdered; his reign ended when he was defeated by Henry Tudor (later Henry VII) at the battle of Bosworth Field (1452-1485)
Translations
ヨークヨーク家
Eboracum
References in classic literature ?
When he began to think about her, Curtis Hartman remembered that she had been to Europe and had lived for two years in New York City.
Tom and his father lived in the village of Shopton, New York, and their factories covered many acres of ground.
He is legal counsel for one of the great Western railways, and is sometimes away from his New York office for weeks together.
Of all the tribes named in these pages, there exist only a few half-civilized beings of the Oneidas, on the reservations of their people in New York.
Such occasions might remind the elderly citizen of that period, before the last war with England, when Salem was a port by itself; not scorned, as she is now, by her own merchants and ship-owners, who permit her wharves to crumble to ruin while their ventures go to swell, needlessly and imperceptibly, the mighty flood of commerce at New York or Boston.
I mention this peaceful spot with all possible laud for it is in such little retired Dutch valleys, found here and there embosomed in the great State of New York, that population, manners, and customs remain fixed, while the great torrent of migration and improvement, which is making such incessant changes in other parts of this restless country, sweeps by them unobserved.
Under this head I reckon a monster which, by the various names of Fin-Back, Tall-Spout, and Long-John, has been seen almost in every sea and is commonly the whale whose distant jet is so often descried by passengers crossing the Atlantic, in the New York packet-tracks.
Hence it is, that, while other ships may have gone to China from New York, and back again, touching at a score of ports, the whale-ship, in all that interval, may not have sighted one grain of soil; her crew having seen no man but floating seamen like themselves.
York, who was to be our new coachman, came in to see us.
He had said it again in New York, when the smooth-spoken agent had taken them in hand and made them pay such high prices, and almost prevented their leaving his place, in spite of their paying.
At once the Bell Company came over to Vail's point of view, bought his new line, and launched out upon what seemed to be the foolhardy enterprise of stringing a double wire from Boston to New York.
The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members) From the New York Packet.