Yorkshire


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Related to Yorkshire: Yorkshire terrier, Yorkshire pudding

York·shire 1

 (yôrk′shîr, -shər)
A historical region and former county of northern England. It was part of Northumbria in Anglo-Saxon times.

York·shire 2

 (yôrk′shîr, -shər)
n.
Any of a breed of swine having a white coat and erect ears, first developed in Yorkshire.

Yorkshire

(ˈjɔːkˌʃɪə; -ʃə)
n
(Placename) a historic county of N England: the largest English county, formerly divided administratively into East, West, and North Ridings. In 1974 it was much reduced in size and divided into the new counties of North, West, and South Yorkshire: in 1996 the East Riding of Yorkshire was reinstated as a unitary authority and parts of the NE were returned to North Yorkshire for geographical and ceremonial purposes

York•shire

(ˈyɔrk ʃɪər, -ʃər)

n.
1. Also called York. a former county in N England, now part of Humberside, North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, Cleveland, and Durham.
2. one of an English breed of white hogs having erect ears.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Yorkshire - a former large county in northern England; in 1974 it was divided into three smaller counties
England - a division of the United Kingdom
References in classic literature ?
There were, then, a good many cheap Yorkshire schools in existence.
Although any man who had proved his unfitness for any other occupation in life, was free, without examination or qualification, to open a school anywhere; although preparation for the functions he undertook, was required in the surgeon who assisted to bring a boy into the world, or might one day assist, perhaps, to send him out of it; in the chemist, the attorney, the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker; the whole round of crafts and trades, the schoolmaster excepted; and although schoolmasters, as a race, were the blockheads and impostors who might naturally be expected to spring from such a state of things, and to flourish in it; these Yorkshire schoolmasters were the lowest and most rotten round in the whole ladder.
I make mention of the race, as of the Yorkshire schoolmasters, in the past tense.
I cannot call to mind, now, how I came to hear about Yorkshire schools when I was a not very robust child, sitting in bye-places near Rochester Castle, with a head full of PARTRIDGE, STRAP, TOM PIPES, and SANCHO PANZA; but I know that my first impressions of them were picked up at that time, and that they were somehow or other connected with a suppurated abscess that some boy had come home with, in consequence of his Yorkshire guide, philosopher, and friend, having ripped it open with an inky pen-knife.
Franklin, "I have been to the lawyer's about some family matters; and, among other things, we have been talking of the loss of the Indian Diamond, in my aunt's house in Yorkshire, two years since.
The next thing to do is to tell how the Diamond found its way into my aunt's house in Yorkshire, two years ago, and how it came to be lost in little more than twelve hours afterwards.
Medlock in a rough, good-natured way, pronouncing his words in a queer broad fashion which Mary found out afterward was Yorkshire.
Medlock, speaking with a Yorkshire accent herself and jerking her head over her shoulder toward Mary.
He mustn't eat the Yorkshire pudding till he's shaken the hand that made it.
Athelny and Philip installed themselves in the great monkish chairs, and Sally brought them in two plates of beef, Yorkshire pudding, baked potatoes, and cabbage.
While I was yet inconsolable for his loss, another friend of mine in Yorkshire discovered an older and more gifted raven at a village public-house, which he prevailed upon the landlord to part with for a consideration, and sent up to me.
Your Yorkshire friend your correspondent in Yorkshire;that would be the way, I suppose, if I were very bad.