Yupik


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Yu·pik

 (yo͞o′pĭk)
n. pl. Yupik or Yu·piks
1. A member of a group of Eskimoan peoples inhabiting the southwest coastal areas of Alaska and extreme northeastern Siberia, particularly the central part of this range.
2.
a. The family of languages spoken by the Yupik.
b. Any of the languages spoken by the Yupik. See Usage Notes at Eskimo, Inuit.

[Yupik Yup'ik, real person : yuk, human being + -pik, real.]

Yu′pik adj.

Yupik

(ˈjuːpɪk)
n
1. (Peoples) an aboriginal people of Alaska, the Aleutian Islands, and E Siberia
2. (Languages) any of the languages of this people
3. (Peoples) of or relating to the Yupik people or their languages. Compare Inuit, Inuktitut
4. (Languages) of or relating to the Yupik people or their languages. Compare Inuit, Inuktitut

Yu•pik

(ˈyu pɪk)

n.
1. a member of any of several Eskimo groups inhabiting SW Alaska, adjacent parts of Siberia, and a number of islands in the Bering Sea and Pacific Ocean.
2. the group of Eskimo languages spoken by these people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Background: The Anchorage School District has partnered with Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Cook Inlet Native Head Start, Alaska Native Heritage Center and the Lower Kuskokwim School District to create and share expertise, curriculum, and professional development in providing a Yupik language immersion program in an Anchorage elementary school.
I traveled to the Arctic Circle and had the privilege of being greeted by these Alaska-native Eskimos of the Inupiat and Yupik tribes.
In Alaska it is Yupik, In Nevada it is Tagalog (spoken by Filipinos), while Vietnamese is the third most popular language in Oklahoma, Nebraska and Texas.
actually have rates about the same as the non-Native rates; Yupik Eskimos in western Alaska are in the middle.
The available literature on the etiology of anaemia among Inuit Peoples, defined as "the Inupiat (Alaska), Yupik (Alaska), Inuit, Inuvialuit (Canada), Kalaallit (Greenland), and Yupik (Russia)" in the charter of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, is limited.
It turns out that the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), the organization representing all Inuit, Inuvialuit, Inupiat, and Yupik peoples from Greenland to Chukotka, is ahead of us on this issue.
In 2006 she moved to Tununak, AK where she taught Yupik Eskimo middle and high school students all subjects except Reading.
High prevalence of myopia among young adult Yupik Eskimos.
Yupik is predominantly spoken in Alaska, a language that belongs to the Eskimo-Aleut languages.
However, she admits to not making the same effort in her previous position as president of NANA Management Services in Alaska, where a number of different cultures meant there are multiple indigenous languages such as Inupiaq and Yupik.
Lawrence Island, the Yupik people keep long-standing traditions alive.
This salmon is caught by Yupik Eskimos living in remote villages at the mouth of this 2000-mile long river.