Zapotec and Mixtec

Zapotec and Mixtec


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AD 300–1524 Indians who built their religious center of Monte Alban 1000–500 BC on a mountain top which they flattened themselves. They farmed, used a calendar, and wrote using hieroglyphics. Elaborate Zapotec tombs suggest that they believed in an afterlife. Mixtec Indians from western Oaxaca occupied the Zapotec “city” of Monte Alban before AD 1 and after 900.
References in periodicals archive ?
42) Although this reading emphasizes Nahuatl deity names, the four direction structure of the Mexica cosmos also integrates many shared elements with the related Zapotec and Mixtec calendars and cosmologies.
The creation and re-creation of ethnicity: Lessons from the Zapotec and Mixtec of Oaxaca.
Just outside the city along the road to Teotitlan, visitors will find the Zapotec and Mixtec ruins of Mitla and Yagul, and just a bit further on is Hierve el Agua, a kind of giant outdoor stalagmite in the form of a frozen waterfall.
This allows small numbers of visitors to witness grass-roots Zapotec and Mixtec celebrations without crushing them with cameras.
Thereafter, rulers from the Zapotec and Mixtec (pronounced "meesh-tek") cultures apparently vied for control of Oaxaca and surrounding areas until the Spanish took over in 1521.
Scarborough and Wilcox's collection includes fifteen of the twenty-four papers originally given, of which six are on the non-Maya ballgame of northern Mesoamerica, from the tlacho of Jalisco and the simple courts of the Hohokam in Arizona, to the complex architecture of the Zapotec and Mixtec ballcourts in Oaxaca.