Zoroaster

(redirected from Zarathushtra)
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Zo·ro·as·ter

 (zôr′ō-ăs′tər) or Zar·a·thu·stra (zăr′ə-tho͞o′strə)
In Zoroastrian tradition, the Iranian prophet who founded Zoroastrianism. The Avesta describes his reception of a revelation from Ahura Mazda and other events in his life, traditionally dated to the 6th century bc.

Zoroaster

(ˌzɒrəʊˈæstə)
n
(Biography) ?628–?551 bc, Persian prophet; founder of Zoroastrianism. Avestan name: Zarathustra

Zo•ro•as•ter

(ˈzɔr oʊˌæs tər, ˈzoʊr-, ˌzɔr oʊˈæs tər, ˌzoʊr-)

n.
fl. 6th century B.C., Persian religious teacher. Also called Zarathustra.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Zoroaster - Persian prophet who founded Zoroastrianism (circa 628-551 BC)
Translations

Zoroaster

[ˌzɒrəʊˈæstəʳ] NZoroastro

Zoroaster

nZoroaster m, → Zarathustra m
References in periodicals archive ?
Followers of Zarathushtra of Iran, the Parsi - Zoroastrians have come to be one of the distinct threads in the tapestry of multicultural India.
Innsbruck, 1974), 193-94, and The Gdthas of Zarathushtra, 2nd ed.
Rabindranath Tagore, in the Foreword to The Divine Songs of Zarathushtra suggests:
Homi Dhalla, Somaya Samir Shantila, Chairman of the Institute for the Research of Indology and Interreligious Dialogue, President of the Jamt-u-Shabab-e Islam Salman Al Husaini Al Nadwi, President of the World Council of Cultural Heritage of Zarathushtra Dr.
Zarathushtra and his antagonists; a sociolinguistic study with English and German translations of his Gathas.
One should be reminded of the fact that Ahura Mazda in the Gathas of Zarathushtra and all the Avestan scriptures is never envisaged in any physical form; only He is to be realized in mind.
The libretto purports to be about the ancient Persian religious leader, also known as Zarathushtra or Sarastro, but like the latter in Mozart's Die Zauberflote, it uses him as the key figure in a battle of Light against Darkness.
Emir Rodriguez Monegal sees the story as being inspired by the same philosophical fiction that Nietzsche used in Also Sprach Zarathushtra (Ficcionario 449).
Manuchehr Dorraj, From Zarathushtra to Khomaini: Populism and Dissent in Iran (Boulder, Colo.