Zedekiah


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Related to Zedekiah: Jehoiakim

Zed·e·ki·ah

 (zĕd′ĭ-kī′ə) Sixth century bc.
The last king of Judah (597-586 bc). He revolted unsuccessfully (588-586) against Nebuchadnezzar II and was sent to captivity in Babylon, where he died.

Zedekiah

(ˌzɛdəˈkaɪə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament the last king of Judah, who died in captivity at Babylon. Douay spelling: Sedecias
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kikuyu leaders in Nakuru still have a bone or two to pick with Mandago after he warned some communities in Uasin Gishu against voting for his worthy rival business magnet Bundotich Zedekiah Kiprop, alias Buzeki.
All squad members, with the exception of Burundian full back Karim Nizigiyimana, have been training at Camp Toyoyo, Jericho in Nairobi for the last three weeks under coaches Dylan Kerr and Zedekiah Otieno.
Although the Davidic kings impressively reigned for over four centuries, the second-longest dynasty in ancient Near Eastern history, (1) it came to an end in 586 BCE with the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple and the exile of Zedekiah.
Zedekiah was an evil king who failed to humble himself before God (2 Chronicles 36:12).
King Zedekiah is slaughtered after witnessing horrible violence.
Both the conquest of Israel by the Assyrians and the conquest of Judah by the Babylonians can be explained politically, but 2 Kings 17:7-13 maintains that the fall of Israel resulted from its moral transgressions, especially widespread idolatry and that the fall of Judah resulted because Zedekiah, its last king, "did what was evil in the eyes of the Lord .
For an analysis of Hieronimo as the sacred warrior destined to reverse the fate of King Zedekiah.
What makes this land deal even more bizarre is the historical setting that we read at the opening: the tenth year of King Zedekiah of Judah (a puppet king) and the eighteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar (the real and foreign king).
From the Hebrew Bible too there is evidence for the routine practice of destroying the sight of enemies: the Philistines bored out the eyes of Samson (Judges 16:21), King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon blinded the captive Hebrew monarch Zedekiah (2 Kings 25:7), and Nahash the Ammonite demanded as a condition of surrender that he should thrust out the right eye of every man of Jabesh-Gilead as a reproach to his Israelite enemies (2 Samuel 9:2).
Familiar figures like Grant, Sherman, Pemberton, and Forrest are included, along with more obscure individuals like Zedekiah McDaniel and John Gregg.
On the contrary, in the report of Nebuchadnezzar's second campaign against Judah in the year 586, which ended with the conquest of Jerusalem, the looting of the Temple, and a mass deportation, it is not concealed that the sons of the Judaean king Zedekiah were killed before their father, that his eyes were put out, and that he was led in chains to Babylon.