Zhdanov


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Zhda·nov

 (zhdä′nəf)

Zhdanov

(Russian ˈʒdanəf)
n
(Placename) the former name (1948–91) of Mariupol

Ma•ri•u•pol

(ˌmær iˈu pəl)

n.
a city in SE Ukraine, on the Sea of Azov. 529,000. Formerly (1948–89), Zhdanov.
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References in periodicals archive ?
dpa Kiev Ukrainian Youth and Sports Minister Ihor Zhdanov signed an order on Wednesday to prohibit all Ukrainian athletes from participating in any sports competition in Russia.
There is evidence to suggest that Stalin--and Lavrentii Beria, Viacheslav Molotov, Andrei Zhdanov, and others in Stalin's inner circle who chimed in--hated Ivan the Terrible, Part II, for another reason altogether: its pervasive, inescapable, often humorous, and always defiant homoeroticism.
It's obvious that this decision is political," said Ivan Zhdanov, who represented Navalny in court.
El informe central estuvo a cargo de Andrei Zhdanov y documenta las percepciones y posiciones de la URSS en la nueva coyuntura internacional.
Dragon operations are in offshore Blocks 2&4, where it produces from two oilfields: Lam and Zhdanov.
Committed writing in the decade, and particularly left-wing writing, is conventionally seen as marked by a dogmatic certainty that reduced literature to propaganda, an instrument to shape public perceptions and behavior, and reduced writers to what Zhdanov, quoting Stalin, described in his speech to the famous 1934 Soviet Writers' Congress as "engineers of human souls" ([1935] 1977, 22).
They have been warned more than once," Sports Minister Igor Zhdanov wrote on his Facebook page, via (https://themoscowtimes.
By and large, one had to conform to the Zhdanov aesthetics, end of story.
In other circumstances, they might have made a competent chamber ensemble: Stalin, Voroshilov and Kaganovich all sang church music; Molotov was a fair violinist; Andrei Zhdanov, the repressor of postwar culture, played the piano.
Zhdanov (1896-1948), an encounter which played a key role in his subsequent rise.