zoopraxiscope


Also found in: Wikipedia.

zoopraxiscope

an early form of motion-picture projector.
See also: Films
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Contemporary dance, physical theatre and impressive visual art mix together in the project to pay tribute to Muybridge, who invented a pioneering movie projector or zoopraxiscope and thus prefigured the era of film and whose works have had a great impact on visual media.
In the late nineteenth century there was a flurry of devices and a parade of names, which all contributed more or less, depending on one's perspective, to the development of cinematic culture in forms that we might recognise today: praxinoscope, zoopraxiscope, chronophotographs, biofantascope, kinetograph, kinetophonograph, Reynaud, Muybridge, Marey, Friese-Green, Edison, to cite just a handful.
In 1879 Muybridge invented the zoopraxiscope to show these photographs in a rapid sequence which created the illusion of a moving racehorse.
Though his later zoopraxiscope projections are celebrated as a critical step in cinema's emergence, their use of hand-rendered and single, rather than stereo, images was in some ways a regression from the dimensional verisimilitude of the "solid miniature horse" Muybridge claims to have conjured with his double zoetrope.
29) This classical relationship between cinema and life highlights the authenticity of life as well as that of cinema as the medium that represents life in its most authentic way, and is pinpointed down among other things by the names of the technological precursors of the cinematograph such as the vitagraph, the bioscope, the vitamotograph, the biocam, the animatograph, the zoopraxiscope, or the biograph.
This three-volume set of of encyclopedias, the coordinated work of 150 contributors, covers American movie history from the invention of the zoopraxiscope to present day, giving attention to how movies interface with social issues including issues of race and gender.
Photographic experiments, like those of Eadweard Muybridge, and new technological gizmos, like the zoopraxiscope, encouraged people to see photographs as single moments sliced out of a continuous timeline.
For his invention in 1879 of the zoopraxiscope, a device containing a turning glass disc for projecting "moving" pictures, he is considered one of the fathers of cinema.
Alongside the Tate's major retrospective, this exhibition examines the place of the Zoopraxiscope in the development of motion picture technology.
Research and report about other scientific animation toys such as the thaumatrope, kineograph, mutoscope, praxinoscope, or zoopraxiscope.
Proofs, negatives, slides, other related drawings and a working replica of his zoopraxiscope motion-picture projector are among the equipment on display.
In 1881 he invented the zoopraxiscope, a forerunner of the moving picture, for the projection of animal pictures on a screen.