Zwinglianism


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Zwing·li·an

 (zwĭng′lē-ən, swĭng′-, tsvĭng′-)
adj.
Of or relating to Ulrich Zwingli or to his theological system, especially his doctrine that the physical body of Jesus is not present in the Eucharist and that the ceremony is merely a symbolic commemoration of Jesus's death.
n.
A follower of Zwingli.

Zwing′li·an·ism n.

Zwinglianism

the doctrine that in the Lord’s supper there is an influence of Christ upon the soul but that the true body of Christ is present only through faith and not reality. — Zwinglianist, n. — Zwinglian, adj.
See also: Christianity
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References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the Reformed doctrine of the sacraments, despite good intentions, ends up in a kind of bare tokenism or Zwinglianism because of the refusal of the Reformed tradition finally to accept the sacrament as the instrumental cause of the grace conferred.
Brooks, 70: "By the middle of the century, Zwinglianism is an outmoded and unhistorical term (although, of course, the 'Reformed' schooi undoubtedly owed much to the clarity of Zwingli's theology).
EARLY RADICAL ZWINGLIANISM TO THE FIRST ZURICH DISPUTATION, JANUARY 1523
5) Michael Walker identified Zwinglianism and Calvinism as the chief influences on Baptist eucharistic theology, though there were others who inherited more from the Anabaptist tradition with their separation of spirit and matter, and their suspicion of anything approximating to ritualism.
I found the assessment and description of early radical Zwinglianism from 1520 to 1523 to be helpful.