pau- / Indo-European roots

pau-1

Few, little.

Oldest form *peh2u-, colored to *pah2u-.

Derivatives include few, pauper, foal, pony, pullet.

I. Adjectival form *pau-, few, little.
1. few from Old English fēawe, few, from Germanic *fawaz.
2. Suffixed form *pau-ko-. paucity, poco from Latin paucus, little, few.
3. Suffixed form *pau-ro- in metathetical form *par-wo-. paraffin, parvorder, parvovirus from Latin parvus, little, small, neuter parvum, becoming parum, little, rarely.
4. Compound *pau-paros, producing little, poor (*par-os, producing; see perə-1) pauper, poor, poverty; depauperate, impoverish from Latin pauper, poor.
II. Suffixed zero-grade form *pu-lo-, young of an animal.
1. foal from Old English fola, young horse, colt, from Germanic *fulōn-.
2. filly from Old Norse fylja, young female horse, from Germanic derivative *fuljō.
III. Basic form *pau- and zero-grade form *pū̆-, boy, child.
1. Suffixed form *pu-ero-. puerile, puerperal from Latin puer, child.
2. Extended form *put-. a. poltroon, pony, pool2, poulard, poulter's measure, poultry, pullet, Punchinello; catchpole from Latin pullus (< *putslo-), young of an animal, chicken; b. pusillanimous from Latin pusillus (< *putslo-lo-), old diminutive of pullus; c. further suffixed form *put-o-. putto from Latin putus, boy.
3. Suffixed form *paw-id-. pedo-2; encyclopedia, orthopedics from Greek pais (stem paid-), child (> paideia, education).

[Pokorny pōu- 842.]


pau-2

To cut, strike, stamp.

Oldest form *peh2u-, colored to *pah2u-.
1. Suffixed (participial) zero-grade form *pu-to-, cut, struck.
a. putamen, putative; account, amputate, compute, count1, depute, dispute, impute, repute from Latin putāre, to prune, clean, settle an account, think over, reflect;
b. possibly Latin puteus, well pit1.
2. Basic form *pau-.
a. Suffixed form *pau-yo. pave, pavé from Latin pavīre, to beat;
b. suffixed (stative) form *paw-ē-. pavid from Latin pavēre, to fear (< "to be struck");
c. perhaps Greek paiein, to beat anapest.

[Pokorny 3. pēu- 827.]



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