abalone


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ab·a·lo·ne

 (ăb′ə-lō′nē, ăb′ə-lō′-)
n.
Any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis, having an ear-shaped shell with a row of holes along the outer edge. The colorful pearly interior of the shell is often used for making jewelry or other ornaments. Also called ear shell.

[American Spanish abulón, from Rumsen (Penutian language of the Monterey Bay area) aulon.]

abalone

(ˌæbəˈləʊnɪ)
n
(Animals) any of various edible marine gastropod molluscs of the genus Haliotis, having an ear-shaped shell that is perforated with a row of respiratory holes. The shells are used for ornament or decoration. Also called: ear shell or haliotis See also ormer
[C19: from American Spanish abulón; origin unknown]

ab•a•lo•ne

(ˌæb əˈloʊ ni)

n.
any gastropod mollusk of the family Haliotidae, having a flat, oval shell: the flesh is used for food and the shell as a source of mother-of-pearl.
[1840–50, Amer.; taken as singular of California Sp abulones, pl. of abulón,aulón]

ab·a·lo·ne

(ăb′ə-lō′nē)
Any of various edible mollusks that have a large, ear-shaped shell. The shell has a row of holes along the outer edge, and the interior is lined with mother-of-pearl.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abalone - any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis having an ear-shaped shell with pearly interiorabalone - any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis having an ear-shaped shell with pearly interior
gastropod, univalve - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
genus Haliotis, Haliotis - type genus of the family Haliotidae
Haliotis tuberculata, ormer, sea-ear - an abalone found near the Channel Islands
Translations
Abalone
abalonipunamerikorva
zeeoor

abalone

[ˌæbəˈləʊnɪ] Noreja f marina

abalone

[ˌæbəˈləʊni] n (= shellfish) → ormeau m abalone shellabalone shell ncoquille f d'ormeau, oreille f de mer

abalone

nSeeohr nt
References in classic literature ?
Not another one of us was ever caught in the closing shell of an abalone.
Billy had to drag Saxon away from the window of a fascinating shop where were iridescent pearls of abalone, set and unset.
My father had a set of cuff-buttons made of abalone shell," she said.
Then, while Billy wandered in a vain search for abalones, Saxon lay and dabbled in the crystal-clear water of a roak-pool, dipping up handfuls of glistening jewels--ground bits of shell and pebble of flashing rose and blue and green and violet.
IRISH food health officials have been fighting the first ever outbreak of Xenohaliotis Californiensis in the Republic of Ireland, which has been detected in four abalone growing sites in the country's south-west.
After a nine-year ban on collecting abalone anywhere along the Southern California coast, the California Fish and Game Commission is considering opening San Miguel Island to fishing for the world's largest type of the sea mollusk.
THE IRISH government has resigned itself to accepting the presence of Xenohaliotis californiensis in Ireland's abalone farms, which it reported last year to the Aquatic Animals Commission (of the Office International des A [per thousand] pizooties).
Its seafood options consist of shrimp, octopus, abalone, oysters and lobster.
Mutton fish: the surviving culture of Aboriginal people and abalone on the south coast of New South Wales
Among these delicacies was a resident of Channel Islands National Park in California: the white abalone, a bottom-dwelling mollusk favored by consumers for its tender white meat.