abbey

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ab·bey

 (ăb′ē)
n. pl. ab·beys
1. A monastery supervised by an abbot.
2. A convent supervised by an abbess.
3. A church that is or once was part of a monastery or convent.

[Middle English, from Old French abaie, from Late Latin abbātia; see abbacy.]

abbey

(ˈæbɪ)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a building inhabited by a community of monks or nuns governed by an abbot or abbess
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a church built in conjunction with such a building
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) such a community of monks or nuns
[C13: via Old French abeie from Church Latin abbātia abbacy]

ab•bey

(ˈæb i)

n., pl. -beys.
1. a monastery under the supervision of an abbot or a convent under the supervision of an abbess.
2. the church of an abbey.
[1200–50; Middle English < Old French abeie < Late Latin abbātia abbacy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abbey - a church associated with a monastery or conventabbey - a church associated with a monastery or convent
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
2.abbey - a convent ruled by an abbessabbey - a convent ruled by an abbess  
convent - a religious residence especially for nuns
3.abbey - a monastery ruled by an abbotabbey - a monastery ruled by an abbot  
monastery - the residence of a religious community

abbey

noun monastery, convent, priory, cloister, nunnery, friary a memorial service at Westminster Abbey
Translations
دَيْرُ الرُّهْباندَيْـر الرُّهْبَاندَيْر، كَنيسَه
абатство
opatstvíopatský chrám
abbediklosterklosterkirke
luostarikirkkoluostari
opatija
apátság
klausturklausturkirkja
僧院
대수도원
abatijavienuolynas
abatijaklosteris
opátsky chrámopátstvo
opatija
kloster
สำนักสงฆ์
manastırmanastır kilisesi
tu việnnhà tu

abbey

[ˈæbɪ]
A. Nabadía f
Westminster Abbeyla Abadía de Westminster
B. CPD abbey church Niglesia f abacial, iglesia f de abadía

abbey

[ˈæbi] nabbaye f

abbey

nAbtei f; (= church in abbey)Klosterkirche f

abbey

[ˈæbɪ] nabbazia, badia

abbey

(ˈӕbi) noun
1. the building(s) in which a Christian (usually Roman Catholic) group of monks or nuns lives.
2. the church now or formerly belonging to it. Westminster Abbey.

abbey

دَيْرُ الرُّهْبان opatství abbedi Abtei αββαείο abadía luostarikirkko abbaye opatija abbazia 僧院 대수도원 abdij kloster opactwo abadia аббатство kloster สำนักสงฆ์ manastır tu viện 修道院
References in classic literature ?
When his dominions were half depopulated, he summoned to his presence a thousand hale and light-hearted friends from among the knights and dames of his court, and with these retired to the deep seclusion of one of his castellated abbeys.
The landed property of Hartfield certainly was inconsiderable, being but a sort of notch in the Donwell Abbey estate, to which all the rest of Highbury belonged; but their fortune, from other sources, was such as to make them scarcely secondary to Donwell Abbey itself, in every other kind of consequence; and the Woodhouses had long held a high place in the consideration of the neighbourhood which Mr.
Another in my place would have been at his excommunicabo vos; but I am placible, and if ye order forth my palfreys, release my brethren, and restore my mails, tell down with all speed an hundred crowns to be expended in masses at the high altar of Jorvaulx Abbey, and make your vow to eat no venison until next Pentecost, it may be you shall hear little more of this mad frolic.
He dismounted weakly and knocked at the Abbey gate.
Right over the town is the ruin of Whitby Abbey, which was sacked by the Danes, and which is the scene of part of "Marmion," where the girl was built up in the wall.
The house would have been nothing but a plain square mansion of Queen Anne's time, but for the remnant of an old abbey to which it was united at one end, in much the same way as one may sometimes see a new farmhouse rising high and prim at the end of older and lower farm-offices.
Between his camp and that of the enemy stood an old abbey, of which, at the present day, there only remain some ruins, but which then was in existence, and was called Newcastle Abbey.
Notre-Dame de Paris has not, like the Abbey of Tournus, the grave and massive frame, the large and round vault, the glacial bareness, the majestic simplicity of the edifices which have the rounded arch for their progenitor.
He is known as the Curtal Friar of Fountain Abbey, and dwelleth in Fountain Dale.
It was enough to drive a woman out of her wits, tied there, and her very dress spotted with him, but she never wanted courage, did Miss Mary Fraser of Adelaide and Lady Brackenstall of Abbey Grange hasn't learned new ways.
Just before you come to the abbey, and right on the river's bank, is Bisham Church, and, perhaps, if any tombs are worth inspecting, they are the tombs and monuments in Bisham Church.
A stranger who knew nothing either of the Abbey or of its immense resources might have gathered from the appearance of the brothers some conception of the varied duties which they were called upon to perform, and of the busy, wide-spread life which centred in the old monastery.