abeyance


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a·bey·ance

 (ə-bā′əns)
n.
1. The condition of being temporarily set aside; suspension: held the plan in abeyance.
2. Law A condition of undetermined ownership, as of an interest in an estate that has not yet vested.

[Anglo-Norman, variant of Old French abeance, desire, from abaer, to gape at : a-, at (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + baer, to gape; see bay2.]

a·bey′ant adj.

abeyance

(əˈbeɪəns) or

abeyancy

n
1. (usually preceded by: in or into) a state of being suspended or put aside temporarily
2. (Law) (usually preceded by in) law an indeterminate state of ownership, as when the person entitled to an estate has not been ascertained
[C16-17: from Anglo-French, from Old French abeance expectation, literally a gaping after, a reaching towards]
aˈbeyant adj

a•bey•ance

(əˈbeɪ əns)

n.
1. temporary inactivity, cessation, or suspension: to hold a question in abeyance.
2. Law. the state of property whose title has not been vested in a known titleholder: an estate in abeyance.
[1520–30; < Anglo-French; Old French abeance aspiration, literally, a gaping at or toward. See a-5, bay2, -ance]
a•bey′ant, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
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Noun1.abeyance - temporary cessation or suspensionabeyance - temporary cessation or suspension  
inaction, inactiveness, inactivity - the state of being inactive
cold storage - in a state of abeyance or postponement
deferral, recess - a state of abeyance or suspended business
moratorium - suspension of an ongoing activity
standdown, stand-down - a suspension and relaxation from an alert state or a state of readiness

abeyance

noun
in abeyance shelved, pending, on ice (informal), in cold storage (informal), hanging fire, suspended The matter was left in abeyance until the next meeting.

abeyance

noun
The condition of being temporarily inactive:
Translations

abeyance

[əˈbeɪəns] N to be in abeyanceestar en desuso
to fall into abeyancecaer en desuso

abeyance

[əˈbeɪəns] n
in abeyance [matter] → en suspens; [threat] → en suspens; [law] → en désuétude

abeyance

n no pl to be in abeyance (law, rule, issue)ruhen; (custom, office)nicht mehr ausgeübt werden; to fall into abeyanceaußer Gebrauch kommen, nicht mehr wirksam sein; to hold/leave something in abeyanceetw ruhen lassen

abeyance

[əˈbeɪəns] n (frm) to be in abeyance (law, custom) → essere in disuso; (matter, plan) → essere in sospeso

abeyance

(əˈbeiəns) : in abeyance
left undecided usually for a short time. The matter was left in abeyance.
References in classic literature ?
Jaggers being highly dictatorial, and Wemmick obstinately justifying himself whenever there was the smallest point in abeyance for a moment.
John, meanwhile, sat collapsed, his chin sunk upon his chest, his mind in abeyance.
Nowadays the military profession is in abeyance and the magisterial robe is the badge of honor.
But every other feeling as it rushed upon his was thrown into abeyance by pity, deep respectful pity, for the man who sat before him--already so bruised, going forth with sad blind resignedness to an unreal sorrow, while a real one was close upon him, too far beyond the range of common trial for him ever to have feared it.
I repeat that the leading principle of embalmment consisted, with us, in the immediately arresting, and holding in perpetual abeyance, all the animal functions subjected to the process.
Our judgment must still be in abeyance," said Professor Challenger, with a huge slab of whitish-colored flesh across his knee.
The beginning of November found its date still in abeyance, though he asked her at the most tempting times.
While these affairs were in abeyance, our visit to Mr.
But in a very short time, all these efforts at communal legislation fell into abeyance.
Katharine's common sense, which had been in abeyance for the past week or two, still failed her, and she could only ask, "But where's your luggage?
Ivanhoe' I had known before, and the 'Bride of Lammermoor' and 'Woodstock', but the rest had remained in that sort of abeyance which is often the fate of books people expect to read as a matter of course, and come very near not reading at all, or read only very late.
Some minutes before midday the first driblets of metal began to flow; the reservoirs filled little by little; and, by the time that the whole melting was completely accomplished, it was kept in abeyance for a few minutes in order to facilitate the separation of foreign substances.