abhorring


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ab·hor

 (ăb-hôr′)
tr.v. ab·horred, ab·hor·ring, ab·hors
To regard with horror or loathing; detest: "The problem with Establishment Republicans is they abhor the unseemliness of a political brawl" (Patrick J. Buchanan).

[Middle English abhorren, from Latin abhorrēre, to shrink from : ab-, from; see ab-1 + horrēre, to shudder.]

ab·hor′rer n.
References in classic literature ?
bury thyself in a life which, to your now equally abhorred and abhorring, landed world, is more oblivious than death.
If I had loved him instead of abhorring him; if I had been attracted to him by the strongest admiration and affection, instead of shrinking from him with the strongest repugnance; it could have been no worse.
Even then it was unruly, abhorring the restraints of civilization, and often in the heat of a dispute getting into the eyes of Madame de Lastaola, the possessor of coveted art treasures, the heiress of Henry Allegre.