abhor

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Related to abhors: Nature Abhors a Vacuum, arbitrating, ascribed

ab·hor

 (ăb-hôr′)
tr.v. ab·horred, ab·hor·ring, ab·hors
To regard with horror or loathing; detest: "The problem with Establishment Republicans is they abhor the unseemliness of a political brawl" (Patrick J. Buchanan).

[Middle English abhorren, from Latin abhorrēre, to shrink from : ab-, from; see ab-1 + horrēre, to shudder.]

ab·hor′rer n.

abhor

(əbˈhɔː)
vb, -hors, -horring or -horred
(tr) to detest vehemently; find repugnant; reject
[C15: from Latin abhorrēre to shudder at, shrink from, from ab- away from + horrēre to bristle, shudder]
abˈhorrer n

ab•hor

(æbˈhɔr)

v.t. -horred, -hor•ring.
to regard with extreme repugnance or aversion; detest; loathe.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin abhorrēre to shrink back from, shudder at =ab- ab- + horrēre to bristle, tremble]
ab•hor′rer, n.
syn: See hate.

abhor


Past participle: abhorred
Gerund: abhorring

Imperative
abhor
abhor
Present
I abhor
you abhor
he/she/it abhors
we abhor
you abhor
they abhor
Preterite
I abhorred
you abhorred
he/she/it abhorred
we abhorred
you abhorred
they abhorred
Present Continuous
I am abhorring
you are abhorring
he/she/it is abhorring
we are abhorring
you are abhorring
they are abhorring
Present Perfect
I have abhorred
you have abhorred
he/she/it has abhorred
we have abhorred
you have abhorred
they have abhorred
Past Continuous
I was abhorring
you were abhorring
he/she/it was abhorring
we were abhorring
you were abhorring
they were abhorring
Past Perfect
I had abhorred
you had abhorred
he/she/it had abhorred
we had abhorred
you had abhorred
they had abhorred
Future
I will abhor
you will abhor
he/she/it will abhor
we will abhor
you will abhor
they will abhor
Future Perfect
I will have abhorred
you will have abhorred
he/she/it will have abhorred
we will have abhorred
you will have abhorred
they will have abhorred
Future Continuous
I will be abhorring
you will be abhorring
he/she/it will be abhorring
we will be abhorring
you will be abhorring
they will be abhorring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been abhorring
you have been abhorring
he/she/it has been abhorring
we have been abhorring
you have been abhorring
they have been abhorring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been abhorring
you will have been abhorring
he/she/it will have been abhorring
we will have been abhorring
you will have been abhorring
they will have been abhorring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been abhorring
you had been abhorring
he/she/it had been abhorring
we had been abhorring
you had been abhorring
they had been abhorring
Conditional
I would abhor
you would abhor
he/she/it would abhor
we would abhor
you would abhor
they would abhor
Past Conditional
I would have abhorred
you would have abhorred
he/she/it would have abhorred
we would have abhorred
you would have abhorred
they would have abhorred
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.abhor - find repugnantabhor - find repugnant; "I loathe that man"; "She abhors cats"
detest, hate - dislike intensely; feel antipathy or aversion towards; "I hate Mexican food"; "She detests politicians"

abhor

verb hate, loathe, despise, detest, shrink from, shudder at, recoil from, be repelled by, have an aversion to, abominate, execrate, regard with repugnance or horror He was a man who abhorred violence.
like, love, enjoy, admire, relish, adore, cherish, delight in

abhor

verb
To regard with extreme dislike and hostility:
Translations
يَكْرَه، يَمْقُت
nenávidětošklivit si
afsky
inhota
hafa viîbjóî á
abhorreo
atgrasusneapkęstišlykštėjimasisšlykštėtis
sajust riebumu, pretīgumu
protiviť sa
avsky

abhor

[əbˈhɔːʳ] VTaborrecer, abominar

abhor

[æbˈhɔːr] vt
(= detest) [+ violence, terrorism, hypocrisy, racism] → abhorrer, exécrer; [+ person] → abhorrer, exécrer
nature abhors a vacuum → la nature a horreur du vide

abhor

abhor

[əbˈhɔːʳ] vtaborrire, provare orrore per

abhor

(əbˈhoː) past tense, past participle abˈhorred verb
to hate very much. The headmaster abhors violence.
abˈhorrence (-ˈho-) noun
abˈhorrent (-ˈho-) adjective
(with to) hateful. Fighting was abhorrent to him.

abhor

vt. aborrecer; tener aversión a algo o a alguien.
References in classic literature ?
Thou canst not be the fair Luscinda's because thou art mine, nor can she be thine because she is Cardenio's; and it will be easier, remember, to bend thy will to love one who adores thee, than to lead one to love thee who abhors thee now.
How is it possible for a poor mercer, who detests Huguenots and who abhors Spaniards, to be accused of high treason?
In these great wastes of forest, life, which abhors darkness, struggles ever upwards to the light.
For Nature, who abhors mannerism, has set her heart on breaking up all styles and tricks, and it is so much easier to do what one has done before than to do a new thing, that there is a perpetual tendency to a set mode.
A man cannot be condemned for a murder at which he was not present, and which he loathes and abhors as much as you do.
He was not a common sort of lover; and he was punished for it as if Nature (which it is said abhors a vacuum) were so very conventional as to abhor every sort of exceptional conduct.
Nature abhors the old, and old age seems the only disease; all others run into this one.
These are the vices which true philanthropy abhors, and which rather than see and converse with, she avoids society itself.
If you continue to be a lady much longer, I shall have you telling me that Society abhors crime--and then, Mouse, I shall doubt if your own eyes and ears are really of any use to you.
But they had lived in a world that abhors enigmas, and cares for no gifts but such as can be obtained in the street.
The roach necessarily abhors the mode in which the pike gets his living, and the pike is likely to think nothing further even of the most indignant roach than that he is excellent good eating; it could only be when the roach choked him that the pike could entertain a strong personal animosity.
I abhor every common-place phrase by which wit is intended; and 'setting one's cap at a man,' or 'making a conquest,' are the most odious of all.