abiding


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a·bid·ing

 (ə-bī′dĭng)
adj.
Lasting for a long time; enduring: an abiding love of music.

a·bid′ing·ly adv.

abiding

(əˈbaɪdɪŋ)
adj
permanent; enduring: an abiding belief.
aˈbidingly adv

a•bid•ing

(əˈbaɪ dɪŋ)

adj.
continuing without change: an abiding faith.
[1250–1300]
a•bid′ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.abiding - unceasing; "an abiding belief"; "imperishable truths"
lasting, permanent - continuing or enduring without marked change in status or condition or place; "permanent secretary to the president"; "permanent address"; "literature of permanent value"

abiding

abiding

adjective
Existing or remaining in the same state for an indefinitely long time:
Translations

abiding

[əˈbaɪdɪŋ] ADJ (liter) → permanente, perdurable

abiding

[əˈbaɪdɪŋ] adj [memory] → durable; [interest, love, passion] → durable
an abiding sense of loyalty → un irréductible sens de la loyauté

abiding

adj (liter: = lasting) → unvergänglich; desire alsobleibend

abiding

[əˈbaɪdɪŋ] adj (memory) → duraturo/a
References in classic literature ?
Perhaps it was the first time she was ready, perhaps the first time her being was tempered to take an impress of the abiding truth.
And brave as he might be, it was that sort of bravery chiefly, visible in some intrepid men, which, while generally abiding firm in the conflict with seas, or winds, or whales, or any of the ordinary irrational horrors of the world, yet cannot withstand those more terrific, because more spiritual terrors, which sometimes menace you from the concentrating brow of an enraged and mighty man.
The force with which she tied her shoe when the lacing came undone, the flirt over shoulder she gave her black braid when she was excited or warm, her manner of studying,--book on desk, arms folded, eyes fixed on the opposite wall,--all had an abiding charm for Seesaw Simpson.
Holy Clerk,'' said the stranger, after the first cup was thus swallowed, ``I cannot but marvel that a man possessed of such thews and sinews as thine, and who therewithal shows the talent of so goodly a trencher-man, should think of abiding by himself in this wilderness.
But when most people are working harder for less, when others cannot work at all, when the cost of health care devastates families and threatens to bankrupt our enterprises, great and small; when the fear of crime robs law abiding citizens of their freedom; and when millions of poor children cannot even imagine the lives we are calling them to lead, we have not made change our friend.
Esther recognised him at once; she had often seen him before, though with her huge indifference for all that lay outside the circle of her love, she had never so much as wondered who he was; but now she recognised him, and found him ten years older, leaden and springless, and stamped by an abiding sorrow.
We have learned now that we cannot regard this planet as being fenced in and a secure abiding place for Man; we can never anticipate the unseen good or evil that may come upon us suddenly out of space.
Nor could this be done in the case of time, for none of the parts of time has an abiding existence, and that which does not abide can hardly have position.
In truth I must acknowledge that, with all the disadvantages of this humble parsonage, I should not think anyone abiding in it an object of compassion, while they are sharers of our intimacy at Rosings.
And there is the abiding thought of a whole year of more or less hard life before one, because there was hardly a southern-going voyage in the yesterday of the sea which meant anything less than a twelvemonth.
The good I fancied I could do is vanished like a dream: the evil of this troublesome world is the only abiding reality
I greatly fear that the Achaeans will pay us their debt of yesterday in full, for there is one abiding at their ships who is never weary of battle, and who will not hold aloof much longer.