abidingly


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a·bid·ing

 (ə-bī′dĭng)
adj.
Lasting for a long time; enduring: an abiding love of music.

a·bid′ing·ly adv.
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Future generations--if they're like ours--will develop their own certainties and will probably be convinced, as we tend to be, that their belief systems--their religions, their ideologies, their politics--are correct and abidingly true.
On one occasion in the Anguttara Nikaya, the Buddha says that one of the five qualities that enables a king to rule abidingly wherever he has conquered is "his strength in the four divisions of his army, loyal and alert to commands.
Critics, both within and outside the church, who today dismiss Nostra aetate as narrowly inclusivistic or abidingly hegemonic do not realize what a surprising and liberating breakthrough it was for us in those days.
lt;{0}>The emergence of order from initial chaos is an experience familiar to every artist, from the moment the act of creation commences until, as Heidegger (1993:169) expressed it, "towering up within itself, the work opens up a world and keeps it abidingly in force.
the South abidingly, must feel the stain of Alabama like a
Whether through his Bauhaus contributions and their shaping of an international modernist canon, or the particular morphologies of his prismatic architectonics and geometries, Feininger's work feels as abidingly consequential to American modernism as to the European avant-garde, in which it took definitive shape.
The impact you made during your recent visit to Bangladesh and your generous message of affection and praise that you lavished on us have endeared you with all of us here, and reaffirmed resoundingly that the bonds of close friendship between Bangladesh and India are deep and abidingly enduring.
It is also worth re-emphasizing that, in the rest of Canada, there is no such conception, for the majority language is not at risk, and cannot be, on a continent where English is abidingly dominant.
8) McDowell may be right about Aristotle, but the interesting question is: if value was conceived as available to our ordinary perceptions of the world around us in so abidingly influential a worldview as Aristotle's, which so dominated centuries of mediaeval Western thought, why in the hands of the Romantics, Blake say, does it come off as an act of resistance to take this view of nature and the world?
Moreover, Monica is abidingly locked with Charles and her father in another such concatenation.
He added: "The theme of the lone hero in a devastated world remains abidingly popular with readers and movie goers alike.
Towering up within itself, the work opens up a world and keeps it abidingly in force" (Heidegger 1993: 169, emphasis in the original) and "To be a work means to set up a world" (170).