abject


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Related to abject: abject fear

ab·ject

 (ăb′jĕkt′, ăb-jĕkt′)
adj.
1. Extremely contemptible or degrading: abject cowardice. See Synonyms at base2.
2. Being of the most miserable kind; wretched: abject poverty; abject grief.
3. Thoroughgoing; complete. Used to modify pejorative nouns: an abject failure.
4. Extremely submissive or self-abasing: abject apologies.

[Middle English, outcast, from Latin abiectus, past participle of abicere, to cast away : ab-, from; see ab-1 + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

ab′ject′ly adv.
ab·ject′ness n.
ab·jec′tion n.

abject

(ˈæbdʒɛkt)
adj
1. utterly wretched or hopeless
2. miserable; forlorn; dejected
3. indicating humiliation; submissive: an abject apology.
4. contemptible; despicable; servile: an abject liar.
[C14: (in the sense: rejected, cast out): from Latin abjectus thrown or cast away, from abjicere, from ab- away + jacere to throw]
abˈjection n
ˈabjectly adv
ˈabjectness n

ab•ject

(ˈæb dʒɛkt, æbˈdʒɛkt)

adj.
1. utterly hopeless or wretched: abject poverty.
2. contemptible; despicable: an abject coward.
3. servile; submissive; slavish.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin abjectus, past participle of abicere, abjicere to hurl, throw down, debase =ab- ab- + -jicere, comb. form of jacere to throw]
ab•ject′ly, adv.
ab•ject′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.abject - of the most contemptible kindabject - of the most contemptible kind; "abject cowardice"; "a low stunt to pull"; "a low-down sneak"; "his miserable treatment of his family"; "You miserable skunk!"; "a scummy rabble"; "a scurvy trick"
contemptible - deserving of contempt or scorn
2.abject - most unfortunate or miserableabject - most unfortunate or miserable; "the most abject slaves joined in the revolt"; "abject poverty"
unfortunate - not favored by fortune; marked or accompanied by or resulting in ill fortune; "an unfortunate turn of events"; "an unfortunate decision"; "unfortunate investments"; "an unfortunate night for all concerned"
3.abject - showing utter resignation or hopelessnessabject - showing utter resignation or hopelessness; "abject surrender"
hopeless - without hope because there seems to be no possibility of comfort or success; "in an agony of hopeless grief"; "with a hopeless sigh he sat down"
4.abject - showing humiliation or submissivenessabject - showing humiliation or submissiveness; "an abject apology"
submissive - inclined or willing to submit to orders or wishes of others or showing such inclination; "submissive servants"; "a submissive reply"; "replacing troublemakers with more submissive people"

abject

adjective
1. wretched, miserable, hopeless, dismal, outcast, pitiful, forlorn, deplorable, pitiable Both of them died in abject poverty.
3. despicable, base, degraded, worthless, vile, sordid, debased, reprehensible, contemptible, dishonourable, ignoble, detestable, scungy (Austral. & N.Z.) the kind of abject low-life that preys on children
Translations
بَائِس، مُدْقَع
ubohý
elendigusselynkelig
hörmungar-, eymdar-
apgailėtinaiapgailėtinasvarganaivarganas
nožēlojams

abject

[ˈæbdʒekt] ADJ
1. (= wretched) [condition] → deplorable; [state] → lamentable
England's abject performance in the World Cupla pésima actuación de Inglaterra en el Mundial
2. (= grovelling) → sumiso
an abject slave to fashionun esclavo sumiso de la moda
he sounded abjectsu tono era sumiso y arrepentido
we received an abject apology from the travel companyrecibimos una carta de la agencia de viajes deshaciéndose en disculpas
3. (as intensifier) [misery, failure] → absoluto; [stupidity] → supino; [cowardice] → abyecto, vil (liter); [surrender] → indigno
to live in abject povertyvivir en la miseria más absoluta

abject

[ˈæbdʒɛkt] adj
[poverty] → sordide
[failure, defeat] → pitoyable; [surrender] → pitoyable; [performance] → pitoyable
[terror, humiliation] → pitoyable
[coward] → méprisable
an abject apology → une excuse plate

abject

adj
(= wretched) state, liar, thiefelend, erbärmlich; povertybitter; failurekläglich
(= servile) submission, apologydemütig; person, gestureunterwürfig

abject

[ˈæbdʒɛkt] (frm) adj (poverty) → abietto/a; (apology) → umiliante; (coward) → indegno/a, vile

abject

(ˈӕbdʒekt) adjective
miserable; wretched. abject poverty.
ˈabjectly adverb
References in classic literature ?
Going in to exult over a fallen enemy and to praise a strong-minded sister for the banishment of an objectionable lover, it certainly was a shock to behold the aforesaid enemy serenely sitting on the sofa, with the strongminded sister enthroned upon his knee and wearing an expression of the most abject submission.
Even the most confident and the stoutest hearts began to think the issue of the contest was becoming doubtful; and that abject class was hourly increasing in numbers, who thought they foresaw all the possessions of the English crown in America subdued by their Christian foes, or laid waste by the inroads of their relentless allies.
It makes boys manly and courageous; and the very vices of an abject race tend to strengthen in them the opposite virtues.
Simpson, and the Simpson family; their poverty, their joyless life, and their abject need of a banquet lamp to brighten their existence.
Tell your master, Nelly, that I never, in all my life, met with such an abject thing as she is.
She saw the abject manikin before her cowering, silent, in his chair.
Then, what submission, what cringing and fawning, what servility, what abject humiliation
From the foldings of its robe, it brought two children; wretched, abject, frightful, hideous, miserable.
Miserable little propitiators of a remorseless Idol, how abject we were to him
That abject hypocrite, Pumblechook, nodded again, and said, with a patronizing laugh, "It's more than that, Mum.
term for abject worthlessness,) ``who should in his own hall, and while his own wine-cup passed, have treated, or suffered to be treated, an unoffending guest as your highness has this day beheld me used; and whatever was the misfortune of our fathers on the field of Hastings, those may at least be silent,'' here he looked at Front-de-B
Neither consideration would have checked her in one of her ungovernable moods, but now she was in an abject one.