abjure


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ab·jure

 (ăb-jo͝or′)
tr.v. ab·jured, ab·jur·ing, ab·jures
1. To recant solemnly; renounce or repudiate: "For nearly 21 years after his resignation as Prime Minister in 1963, he abjured all titles, preferring to remain just plain 'Mr.'" (Time).
2. To renounce under oath; forswear.

[Middle English abjuren, from Old French abjurer, from Latin abiūrāre : ab-, away; see ab-1 + iūrāre, to swear; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

ab′ju·ra′tion n.
ab·jur′er n.

abjure

(əbˈdʒʊə)
vb (tr)
1. to renounce or retract, esp formally, solemnly, or under oath
2. to abstain from or reject
[C15: from Old French abjurer or Latin abjurāre to deny on oath]
ˌabjuˈration n
abˈjurer n

ab•jure

(æbˈdʒʊər, -ˈdʒɜr)

v.t. -jured, -jur•ing.
1. to repudiate or retract, esp. with formal solemnity; recant.
2. to renounce or give up under oath; forswear: to abjure allegiance to a country.
3. to refrain from; avoid.
[1400–50; < Latin abjūrāre to deny on oath =ab- ab- + jūrāre to swear; see jury1]
ab•jur′a•to`ry, adj.
ab•jur′er, n.

abjure


Past participle: abjured
Gerund: abjuring

Imperative
abjure
abjure
Present
I abjure
you abjure
he/she/it abjures
we abjure
you abjure
they abjure
Preterite
I abjured
you abjured
he/she/it abjured
we abjured
you abjured
they abjured
Present Continuous
I am abjuring
you are abjuring
he/she/it is abjuring
we are abjuring
you are abjuring
they are abjuring
Present Perfect
I have abjured
you have abjured
he/she/it has abjured
we have abjured
you have abjured
they have abjured
Past Continuous
I was abjuring
you were abjuring
he/she/it was abjuring
we were abjuring
you were abjuring
they were abjuring
Past Perfect
I had abjured
you had abjured
he/she/it had abjured
we had abjured
you had abjured
they had abjured
Future
I will abjure
you will abjure
he/she/it will abjure
we will abjure
you will abjure
they will abjure
Future Perfect
I will have abjured
you will have abjured
he/she/it will have abjured
we will have abjured
you will have abjured
they will have abjured
Future Continuous
I will be abjuring
you will be abjuring
he/she/it will be abjuring
we will be abjuring
you will be abjuring
they will be abjuring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been abjuring
you have been abjuring
he/she/it has been abjuring
we have been abjuring
you have been abjuring
they have been abjuring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been abjuring
you will have been abjuring
he/she/it will have been abjuring
we will have been abjuring
you will have been abjuring
they will have been abjuring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been abjuring
you had been abjuring
he/she/it had been abjuring
we had been abjuring
you had been abjuring
they had been abjuring
Conditional
I would abjure
you would abjure
he/she/it would abjure
we would abjure
you would abjure
they would abjure
Past Conditional
I would have abjured
you would have abjured
he/she/it would have abjured
we would have abjured
you would have abjured
they would have abjured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.abjure - formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressureabjure - formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure; "He retracted his earlier statements about his religion"; "She abjured her beliefs"
repudiate, disown, renounce - cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"

abjure

verb
1. give up, deny, reject, abandon, relinquish, renounce, throw off, forsake, retract, disown, renege on, disavow, recant, disclaim, forswear, wash your hands of, abnegate He abjured the Protestant faith in 1594.
2. refrain from, avoid, eschew, abstain from, abnegate countries whose officials abjure bribery

abjure

verb
To disavow (something previously written or said) irrevocably and usually formally:
Translations

abjure

[əbˈdʒʊəʳ] VT (frm) → renunciar a, abjurar de

abjure

[æbˈdʒʊər] vtrenoncer à (par serment ou publiquement)

abjure

vtabschwören (+dat)

abjure

[əbˈdʒuəʳ] vt (frm) → abiurare
References in classic literature ?
To gaze into the depths of blue of the child's eyes and pronounce their loveliness a trick of premature cunning was to be guilty of a cynicism in preference to which I naturally preferred to abjure my judgment and, so far as might be, my agitation.
In the taking of legal oaths, for instance, deponents seem to enjoy themselves mightily when they come to several good words in succession, for the expression of one idea; as, that they utterly detest, abominate, and abjure, or so forth; and the old anathemas were made relishing on the same principle.
I am half resolved to go to the Grand Master, abjure the Order to his very teeth, and refuse to act the brutality which his tyranny has imposed on me.
We erected our tent, and placed our altar under some great trees, for the benefit of the shade; and every day before sun-rising my companion and I began to catechise and instruct these new Catholics, and used our utmost endeavours to make them abjure their errors.
And while I suffer thus, there comes no ray Of hope to gladden me athwart the gloom; Nor do I look for it in my despair; But rather clinging to a cureless woe, All hope do I abjure for evermore.
I swear to you, Monsieur Commissary, that you are in the profoundest error, that I know nothing in the world about what my wife had to do, that I am entirely a stranger to what she has done; and that if she has committed any follies, I renounce her, I abjure her, I curse her
Once a man has lost his self-respect, and has decided to abjure his better qualities and human dignity, he falls headlong, and cannot choose but do so.
On receiving this the victim might either openly abjure his former ways, or might fly from the country.
For, according to the order of nature, which is quite superior to our will, it stands thus; there will always be a government of force where men are selfish; and when they are pure enough to abjure the code of force they will be wise enough to see how these public ends of the post-office, of the highway, of commerce and the exchange of property, of museums and libraries, of institutions of art and science can be answered.
When I found that he was a Catholic I was almost ready to abjure the Protestant religion for his sake; but I perceived that this was not necessary when I came to know that most of his friends were Protestants.
With one word, by drawing one mournful face, I could have got my mother to abjure the jam-shelf - nay, I might have managed it by merely saying that she had enjoyed 'The Master of Ballantrae.
This event led them both not only to abjure marriage, but to feel a horror of children; ill at ease with them, they feared them as others fear madmen, and watched them with haggard eyes.