abominate

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a·bom·i·nate

 (ə-bŏm′ə-nāt′)
tr.v. a·bom·i·nat·ed, a·bom·i·nat·ing, a·bom·i·nates
To detest thoroughly; abhor.

[Latin abōminārī, abōmināt-, to deprecate as a bad omen : ab-, away; see ab-1 + ōmen, omen.]

a·bom′i·na′tor n.

abominate

(əˈbɒmɪˌneɪt)
vb
(tr) to dislike intensely; loathe; detest
[C17: from the past participle of Latin abōminārī to regard as an ill omen, from ab- away from + ōmin-, from omen]
aˈbomiˌnator n

a•bom•i•nate

(əˈbɒm əˌneɪt)

v.t. -nat•ed, -nat•ing.
1. to regard with intense aversion or loathing; abhor.
2. to feel distaste for; dislike.
[1840–50; < Latin abōminātus loathed, past participle of abōminārī. See abominable, -ate1]
a•bom′i•na`tor, n.

abominate


Past participle: abominated
Gerund: abominating

Imperative
abominate
abominate
Present
I abominate
you abominate
he/she/it abominates
we abominate
you abominate
they abominate
Preterite
I abominated
you abominated
he/she/it abominated
we abominated
you abominated
they abominated
Present Continuous
I am abominating
you are abominating
he/she/it is abominating
we are abominating
you are abominating
they are abominating
Present Perfect
I have abominated
you have abominated
he/she/it has abominated
we have abominated
you have abominated
they have abominated
Past Continuous
I was abominating
you were abominating
he/she/it was abominating
we were abominating
you were abominating
they were abominating
Past Perfect
I had abominated
you had abominated
he/she/it had abominated
we had abominated
you had abominated
they had abominated
Future
I will abominate
you will abominate
he/she/it will abominate
we will abominate
you will abominate
they will abominate
Future Perfect
I will have abominated
you will have abominated
he/she/it will have abominated
we will have abominated
you will have abominated
they will have abominated
Future Continuous
I will be abominating
you will be abominating
he/she/it will be abominating
we will be abominating
you will be abominating
they will be abominating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been abominating
you have been abominating
he/she/it has been abominating
we have been abominating
you have been abominating
they have been abominating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been abominating
you will have been abominating
he/she/it will have been abominating
we will have been abominating
you will have been abominating
they will have been abominating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been abominating
you had been abominating
he/she/it had been abominating
we had been abominating
you had been abominating
they had been abominating
Conditional
I would abominate
you would abominate
he/she/it would abominate
we would abominate
you would abominate
they would abominate
Past Conditional
I would have abominated
you would have abominated
he/she/it would have abominated
we would have abominated
you would have abominated
they would have abominated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.abominate - find repugnantabominate - find repugnant; "I loathe that man"; "She abhors cats"
detest, hate - dislike intensely; feel antipathy or aversion towards; "I hate Mexican food"; "She detests politicians"

abominate

verb hate, dislike, loathe, despise, detest, abhor, shudder at, recoil from, regard with repugnance, feel repelled by, have an aversion to, execrate, feel hostile to 'I abominate dogma,' he said.
hate love, admire, treasure, worship, esteem, adore, cherish, revere, dote on, idolize

abominate

verb
To regard with extreme dislike and hostility:
Translations
يَكْرَه، يَمْقُت
hnusit si
afsky
inhotakammoksuavihata
hafa óbeit á
bjaurėjimasisbjaurėtis
sajust riebumu
avsky
iğrenmektiksinmek

abominate

[əˈbɒmɪneɪt] VT (frm) → abominar (de), detestar

abominate

abominate

[əˈbɒmɪneɪt] vt (frm) → aborrire

abominate

(əˈbomineit) verb
to detest. He abominates cruelty.
aˌbomiˈnation noun
References in classic literature ?
And yet, even while I blamed him most bitterly, and utterly abominated his deceitful deed, I could not but admit in my heart that the result was put of all proportion to the intent: he had never dreamt of doing me this injury, or indeed any injury at all.
Crow is dead, racism is overwhelmingly abominated, and a black man is
In a later letter to Henri Parisot, written at Rodez, dated 7 September 1945, Artaud was trying to clarify the situation and proclaimed that it was a stupid mistake for him to claim that he had accepted conversion to Jesus Christ: "I was fool enough to say I had accepted conversion to Jesus Christ, while in very fact Christ is that which I have always most of all abominated, and this conversion was merely the result of a frightful spell which had made me forget my very nature and had made me swallow, at Rodez, under the guise of Communion, a frightful number of wafers destined to preserve me for as long as possible, and if possible for all eternity, in a being that is not my own .
The association of the Crown with occasions of socially shared delight, though it may seem to veer dangerously close to Jim Dixon's abominated Merrie England, was a more subtle form of propaganda.
He felt about it rather as Yeats felt about "The Lake Isle of Innisfree," or as Beckett felt about Murphy: he abominated it.
Figueroa, warning of war, concluded that the individuals who supported unconditional secularization would see their names entered "in the annals of fratricidal strife, in civil disorders, in the farcical notions of the anarchists--that ominous sect abominated in America and Europe.
in paradise, Aurelian discovered that in the eyes of the unfathomable deity, he and John of Pannonia (the orthodox and the heretic, the abominator and the abominated, the accuser and the victim) were a single person" ("The Theologians" 207).
William Cullen Bryant abominated the War of 1812; Emerson and John Greenleaf Whittier took their stands against the Mexican War.
Rarely, however, are such transgressions abominated as are offenses against persons.
Dionne to rewrite National Review's history--"Buckley was determined to rid the right of the wing nuts"--Professor Gottfried stresses two factors: the sheer inconsistency of Buckley's editorial purges, and the fact that even the purged National Review regularly exhibited during the 1960s various attitudes which would now be universally abominated as "sexist", "racist", and "fascist".