amputation

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am·pu·tate

 (ăm′pyo͝o-tāt′)
tr.v. am·pu·tat·ed, am·pu·tat·ing, am·pu·tates
To cut off (a projecting body part), especially by surgery.

[Latin amputāre, amputāt-, to cut around : am-, ambi-, around; see ambi- + putāre, to cut; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

am′pu·ta′tion n.
am′pu·ta′tor n.

amputation


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Surgery to remove a limb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amputation - a condition of disability resulting from the loss of one or more limbsamputation - a condition of disability resulting from the loss of one or more limbs
disability, disablement, handicap, impairment - the condition of being unable to perform as a consequence of physical or mental unfitness; "reading disability"; "hearing impairment"
2.amputation - a surgical removal of all or part of a limbamputation - a surgical removal of all or part of a limb
surgical operation, surgical procedure, surgical process, surgery, operation - a medical procedure involving an incision with instruments; performed to repair damage or arrest disease in a living body; "they will schedule the operation as soon as an operating room is available"; "he died while undergoing surgery"
Translations
بَـتْـر
amputace
amputation
amputaatio
amputacija
amputálás
aflimun

amputation

[ˌæmpjʊˈteɪʃən] Namputación f

amputation

[ˌæmpjʊˈteɪʃən] n [limb, hand, tail] → amputation f

amputation

nAmputation f

amputation

[ˌæmpjʊˈteɪʃn] namputazione f

amputate

(ˈӕmpjuteit) verb
(of a surgeon etc) to cut off (an arm or leg etc). They are going to have to amputate (his left leg).
ˌampuˈtation noun

am·pu·ta·tion

n. amputación, desmembración.

amputation

n amputación f; above-the-knee — amputación por encima de la rodilla; below-the-knee— amputación por debajo de la rodilla
References in periodicals archive ?
All cases including the terms above-knee amputation (AKA), through-knee amputation (TKA), below-knee amputation (BKA), supramalleolar amputation (SMA), forefoot/transmetatarsal amputation (TMA) and digit amputation (DA) were included as an LEA in this study.
The 35-year-old (below) had a double above-knee amputation but has run marathons all over the world since.
This emphasises the importance of attempting to preserve the knee joint and to make an adequate assessment of the perfusion at the site at which the elective amputation is to occur, before committing to an above-knee amputation.
Above-knee amputation and below-knee amputation are the predominant types of surgeries.
The case involved a 43-year-old man who received two units of packed red blood cells during an above-knee amputation necessitated by complications of diabetes.
As someone who's always more than a bit cautious about this type of book, even I must admit to have been moved by the tale of Mary Self who was diagnosed with bone cancer and underwent above-knee amputation and intensive chemotherapy.