abrasion


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to abrasion: abrasion test

a·bra·sion

 (ə-brā′zhən)
n.
1. The process of wearing down or rubbing away by means of friction.
2.
a. A scraped or worn area.
b. A scraped area on the skin or on a mucous membrane, resulting from injury or irritation.

[Medieval Latin abrāsiō, abrāsiōn-, from Latin abrāsus, past participle of abrādere, to scrape off; see abrade.]

abrasion

(əˈbreɪʒən)
n
1. the process of scraping or wearing down by friction
2. a scraped area or spot; graze
3. (Physical Geography) geography the effect of mechanical erosion of rock, esp a river bed, by rock fragments scratching and scraping it; wearing down. Compare attrition4, corrasion
[C17: from Medieval Latin abrāsiōn-, from the past participle of Latin abrādere to abrade]

a•bra•sion

(əˈbreɪ ʒən)

n.
1. a scraped spot or area; the result of rubbing or abrading: abrasions on his leg.
2. the act or process of abrading.
[1650–60; < Medieval Latin abrāsiō < Latin abrād(ere) (see abrade)]

ab·ra·sion

(ə-brā′zhən)
1. The process of wearing away or rubbing down by means of friction.
2. A scraped area on the skin.

abrasion

In photography, a scratch or mark produced mechanically on an emulsion surface or film base.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abrasion - an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn offabrasion - an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn off
graze - a superficial abrasion
rope burn - abrasion (usually on the hands) caused by friction from a rope
wound, lesion - an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin)
2.abrasion - erosion by frictionabrasion - erosion by friction      
eating away, eroding, erosion, wearing, wearing away - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
3.abrasion - the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or iceabrasion - the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or ice
rubbing, friction - the resistance encountered when one body is moved in contact with another

abrasion

noun
1. (Medical) graze, scratch, trauma (Pathology), scrape, scuff, chafe, surface injury He had severe abrasions to his right cheek.
2. rubbing, wear, scratching, scraping, grating, friction, scouring, attrition, corrosion, wearing down, erosion, scuffing, chafing, grinding down, wearing away, abrading The sole of the shoe should be designed to take constant abrasion.
Translations
كَشْط ، خَدْش، حَكْ
абразия
odřenina
hudafskrabning
hiertymähiomapölyhiontakuluma
abrasionécorchuresurcreusement
skráma
abrazyvinisįdrėskimasnubrozdinimasšvitras
noberzumsnobrāzums

abrasion

[əˈbreɪʒən] N (= act, injury) → abrasión f, escoriación f

abrasion

[əˈbreɪʒən] n
(on skin)écorchure f
(= friction) [metal, stone etc surfaces] → abrasion f

abrasion

n (Med) → (Haut)abschürfung f; (Geol) → Abtragung f

abrasion

[əˈbreɪʒn] nabrasione f; (injury) → escoriazione f, abrasione f

abrasion

(əˈbreiʒən) noun
an injury caused by scraping or grazing the skin. minor abrasions.
aˈbrasive (-siv) adjective
tending to make surfaces rough when rubbed on to them. An abrasive material is unsuitable for cleaning baths.
noun
something used for scraping or rubbing a surface. Sandpaper is an abrasive.

a·bra·sion

n. abrasión, excoriación, irritación o raspadura de las mucosas o de una superficie a causa de una fricción o de un trauma;
___ collarcírculo de ___, marca circular de pólvora que deja en la piel el disparo de un arma de fuego.

abrasion

n abrasión f (form), raspadura
References in classic literature ?
The ring-finger had suffered a slight abrasion, and the stain of the blood was still visible and unchanged after forty-one years.
At other places the banks were banded with great veins of iron ore, laid bare by the abrasion of the river.
Locking the cow's head in an iron stanchion, he had shed his coat, rolled up his right sleeve almost to the shoulder, washed his hand and arm in a solution of carbolic and hot water, carefully examining them to make sure there was no abrasion of any kind.
The sudden arrest of his motion, the abrasion of one of his hands on the gravel, restored him, and he wept with delight.
As long as the criminal remains upon two legs so long must there be some indentation, some abrasion, some trifling displacement which can be detected by the scientific searcher.
Nowhere upon any of them was the sign of mortal wound, nor even slightest scratch or abrasion.
It is true that fever and dysentery are perpetually on the walk-about, that loathsome skin diseases abound, that the air is saturated with a poison that bites into every pore, cut, or abrasion and plants malignant ulcers, and that many strong men who escape dying there return as wrecks to their own countries.
She noticed that the hand he waved was covered with fresh abrasions, in the process of healing, and a glance at the other loose-hanging hand showed it to be in the same condition.
Abrasion resistance testing suggests that traffic markings with 3 year durability could be achieved with a 15 wet mil line if a high durability latex binder was employed in the traffic marking paint formulation.
Industrial Manager, contacted Intralox to learn more about its new, long-lasting conveyance solution for tomato processing applications, the Abrasion Resistant System, which he had been shown on previous occasions.
Background: Air abrasion is a technique for removing dental caries and it has been reintroduced into the clinical setting as a result of improvements in equipment in association with both adhesive material development and minimally invasive restorative philosophy.
Boone Baker, a then- wide receiver for the Austin (TX) High Maroons junior varsity, nearly lost his life to MRSA after sustaining a turf abrasion on his shoulder following a tackle in an October 7, 2005 game vs Westlake High.