abridger


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a·bridge

 (ə-brĭj′)
tr.v. a·bridged, a·bridg·ing, a·bridg·es
1. To reduce the length of (a written text); condense: The editor abridged the manuscript by cutting out two chapters. See Synonyms at shorten.
2. To limit; curtail: an unconstitutional law that abridged the rights of citizens.

[Middle English abregen, from Old French abregier, from Late Latin abbreviāre, to shorten; see abbreviate.]

a·bridg′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abridger - one who shortens or abridges or condenses a written workabridger - one who shortens or abridges or condenses a written work
redact, redactor, reviser, rewrite man, rewriter - someone who puts text into appropriate form for publication
Translations
References in classic literature ?
And while the abilities of the nine-hundredth abridger of the History of England, or of the man who collects and publishes in a volume some dozen lines of Milton, Pope, and Prior, with a paper from the Spectator, and a chapter from Sterne, are eulogized by a thousand pens -- there seems almost a general wish of decrying the capacity and undervaluing the labour of the novelist, and of slighting the performances which have only genius, wit, and taste to recommend them.
Thompson gets down to the effectiveness of the shot/reverse shot treatment of Gollum's arguments with himself, while Kaveny shows how Gollum serves as "an abridger," who "integrat[es] the big picture of what is at stake on a moral ethical and spiritual level" (189).
And while the abilities of the nine-hundredth abridger of the History of England, or of the man who collects and publishes in a volume some dozen lines of Milton, Pope, and Prior, with a paper from the Spectator, and a chapter from Sterne, are eulogized by a thousand pens,--there seems almost a general wish of decrying the capacity and undervaluing the labour of the novelist, and of slighting the performances which have only genius, wit, and taste to recommend them.