absent-minded


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Related to absent-minded: absent-mindedly

ab·sent-mind·ed

(ăb′sənt-mīn′dĭd)
adj.
Deep in thought and heedless of present circumstances or activities; preoccupied.

ab′sent-mind′ed·ly adv.
ab′sent-mind′ed·ness n.

absent-minded

adj
preoccupied; forgetful; inattentive
ˌabsent-ˈmindedly adv
ˌabsent-ˈmindedness n

ab′sent-mind′ed

or ab′sent•mind′ed,



adj.
preoccupied with one's thoughts so as to be unaware or forgetful of other matters.
[1850–55]
ab′sent-mind′ed•ly, adv.
ab′sent-mind′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

absent-minded

adjective forgetful, absorbed, abstracted, vague, absent, distracted, unaware, musing, preoccupied, careless, bemused, oblivious, dreamy, faraway, engrossed, unthinking, neglectful, heedless, inattentive, unmindful, unheeding, apt to forget, in a brown study, ditzy or ditsy (slang) In his later life he became even more absent-minded.
alert, awake, wary, on the ball, vigilant, quick, perceptive, observant, wide-awake, on your toes

absent-minded

adjective
So lost in thought as to be unaware of one's surroundings:
Idiom: a million miles away.
Translations

absent-minded

[ˈæbsəntˈmaɪndɪd] ADJ (momentarily) → distraído, ausente; (habitually) → despistado, distraído
an absent-minded professorun profesor despistado or distraído

absent-minded

adj (= lost in thought)geistesabwesend; (= habitually forgetful)zerstreut

absent-minded

[ˌæbsntˈmaɪndɪd] adjdistratto/a

absent

(ˈӕbsənt) adjective
not present. Johnny was absent from school with a cold.
(əbˈsent) verb
to keep (oneself) away. He absented himself from the meeting.
ˈabsence noun
1. the condition of not being present. His absence was noticed.
2. a time during which a person etc is not present. After an absence of five years he returned home.
ˌabsenˈtee noun
a person who is not present, especially frequently (eg at work, school etc).
ˌabsenˈteeism noun
being often absent from work etc without good reason. Absenteeism is a problem in some industries.
ˌabsent-ˈminded adjective
not noticing what is going on around one because one is thinking deeply. an absent-minded professor.
ˌabsentˈmindedly adverb
ˌabsent-ˈmindedness noun

absent-minded

شاَرِدُ الذِّهْن roztržitý åndsfraværende geistesabwesend αφηρημένος distraído hajamielinen étourdi odsutan duhom distratto ぼんやりした 멍한 verstrooid distré roztargniony distraído рассеянный tankspridd ใจลอย dalgın chểnh mảng 心不在焉

absent-minded

adj distraído, despistado
References in classic literature ?
Meg was absent-minded, shy, and silent, started when the bell rang, and colored when John's name was mentioned.
Johnnie had been having drinks with the guests until he was rather absent-minded.
The little negro girl who worked Madame Lebrun's sewing-machine was sweeping the galleries with long, absent-minded strokes of the broom.
Let the most absent-minded of men be plunged in his deepest reveries--stand that man on his legs, set his feet a-going, and he will infallibly lead you to water, if water there be in all that region.
They was still a minute -- thinking; then the king says, kind of absent-minded like:
He surveyed the prize; walked around it; smelt at it from a safe distance; walked around it again; grew bolder, and took a closer smell; then lifted his lip and made a gingerly snatch at it, just missing it; made another, and another; began to enjoy the diversion; subsided to his stomach with the beetle between his paws, and continued his experiments; grew weary at last, and then indifferent and absent-minded.
Why, Aunt Polly, he was always so good and kind and moony and absent-minded and chuckle-headed and lovable--why, he was just an angel
There was considerable of it, and Miss Miranda remarked, among other things, that so absent-minded a child was sure to grow up into a driveling idiot.
But he now understood why Raoul was absent-minded when spoken to and why he always tried to turn every conversation to the subject of the Opera.
He does not know what cards he holds; he is getting very absent-minded.
The angles of a Square (and still more those of an equilateral Triangle), being much more pointed than those of a Pentagon, and the lines of inanimate objects (such as houses) being dimmer than the lines of Men and Women, it follows that there is no little danger lest the points of a square or triangular house residence might do serious injury to an inconsiderate or perhaps absent-minded traveller suddenly therefore, running against them: and as early as the eleventh century of our era, triangular houses were universally forbidden by Law, the only exceptions being fortifications, powder-magazines, barracks, and other state buildings, which it is not desirable that the general public should approach without circumspection.
For instance, if I am recalling an incident very vividly I go back to the instant of its occurrence: I become absent-minded, as you say.