absolute


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Related to absolute: absolute temperature, Absolute pressure

ab·so·lute

 (ăb′sə-lo͞ot′, ăb′sə-lo͞ot′)
adj.
1.
a. Unqualified in extent or degree; total: absolute silence.
b. Not limited by restrictions or exceptions: an absolute right.
c. Being fully such; utter: an absolute fool.
d. Unconstrained by constitutional or other provisions: an absolute ruler.
2. Not mixed; pure: absolute oxygen.
3. Not to be doubted or questioned; positive: absolute proof.
4. Grammar
a. Of, relating to, or being a word, phrase, or construction that is isolated syntactically from the rest of a sentence, as the referee having finally arrived in The referee having finally arrived, the game began.
b. Of, relating to, or being a transitive verb when its object is implied but not stated. For example, inspires in We have a teacher who inspires is an absolute verb.
c. Of, relating to, or being an adjective or pronoun that stands alone when the noun it modifies is being implied but not stated. For example, in Theirs were the best, theirs is an absolute pronoun and best is an absolute adjective.
5. Physics
a. Relating to measurements or units of measurement derived from fundamental units of length, mass, and time.
b. Relating to absolute temperature.
6. Law Complete and unconditional; final: an absolute divorce.
n.
1. Something that is absolute.
2. Absolute Philosophy
a. Something regarded as the ultimate basis of all thought and being. Used with the.
b. Something regarded as independent of and unrelated to anything else.

[Middle English absolut, from Latin absolūtus, unrestricted, past participle of absolvere, to absolve : ab-, away; see ab-1 + solvere, to loosen; see leu- in Indo-European roots.]

ab′so·lute′ness n.
Usage Note: An absolute term denotes a property that a thing either can or cannot have. Such terms include absolute itself, chief, complete, perfect, prime, unique, and mathematical terms such as equal and parallel. By strict logic, absolute terms cannot be compared, as by more and most, or used with an intensive modifier, such as very or so. Something either is complete or it isn't—it cannot be more complete than something else. Consequently, sentences such as He wanted to make his record collection more complete, and You can improve the sketch by making the lines more perpendicular, are often criticized as illogical. Such criticism confuses pure logic or a mathematical ideal with the rough approximations that are frequently needed in ordinary language. Certainly in some contexts we should use words strictly logically; otherwise teaching mathematics would be impossible. But we often think in terms of a scale or continuum rather than in clearly marked either/or categories. Thus, we may think of a statement as either logically true or false, but we also know that there are degrees of truthfulness and falsehood. Similarly, there may be degrees of completeness to a record collection, and some lines may be more perpendicular—that is, they may more nearly approximate mathematical perpendicularity—than other lines. See Usage Notes at equal, unique.

absolute

(ˈæbsəˌluːt)
adj
1. complete; perfect
2. free from limitations, restrictions, or exceptions; unqualified: an absolute choice.
3. having unlimited authority; despotic: an absolute ruler.
4. undoubted; certain: the absolute truth.
5. not dependent on, conditioned by, or relative to anything else; independent: an absolute term in logic; the absolute value of a quantity in physics.
6. pure; unmixed: absolute alcohol.
7. (Grammar) (of a grammatical construction) syntactically independent of the main clause, as for example the construction Joking apart in the sentence Joking apart, we'd better leave now
8. (Grammar) grammar (of a transitive verb) used without a direct object, as the verb intimidate in the sentence His intentions are good, but his rough manner tends to intimidate
9. (Grammar) grammar (of an adjective) used as a noun, as for instance young and aged in the sentence The young care little for the aged
10. (General Physics) physics
a. (postpositive) (of a pressure measurement) not relative to atmospheric pressure: the pressure was 5 bar absolute. Compare gauge18
b. denoting absolute or thermodynamic temperature
11. (Mathematics) maths
a. (of a constant) never changing in value
b. Also: numerical (of an inequality) unconditional
c. (of a term) not containing a variable
12. (Law) law (of a court order or decree) coming into effect immediately and not liable to be modified; final. See decree absolute
13. (Law) law (of a title to property, etc) not subject to any encumbrance or condition
n
something that is absolute
[C14: from Latin absolūtus unconditional, freed from, from absolvere. See absolve]

Absolute

(ˈæbsəˌluːt)
n (sometimes not capital)
1. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the ultimate basis of reality
b. that which is totally unconditioned, unrestricted, pure, perfect, or complete
2. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of Hegel) that towards which all things evolve dialectically

ab•so•lute

(ˈæb səˌlut, ˌæb səˈlut)

adj.
1. being fully or perfectly as indicated; complete; perfect.
2. free from restriction, limitation, or exception: absolute power; absolute freedom.
3. outright; unqualified: an absolute lie; an absolute denial.
4. unrestrained in the exercise of governmental power; not limited by laws or a constitution: an absolute monarchy.
5. viewed independently; not comparative or relative; ultimate: absolute knowledge.
6. positive; certain; definite: absolute in opinion; absolute proof.
7. not mixed or adulterated; pure.
8.
a. relatively independent syntactically in relation to other elements in a sentence, as the construction It being Sunday in It being Sunday, I wasn't at work.
b. (of a usu. transitive verb) used without an object, as give in Please give generously.
c. (of an adjective or possessive pronoun) used alone, with the noun that is modified understood but not expressed, as hungry in to feed the hungry or mine in Take mine.
9. Physics.
a. independent of arbitrary standards or of particular properties of substances or systems: absolute humidity.
b. pertaining to a system of units, as the centimeter-gram-second system, based on some primary units, esp. units of length, mass, and time.
c. pertaining to a measurement based on an absolute zero or unit, as in the absolute temperature scale.
10. Math. (of an inequality) indicating that the expression is true for all values of the variable, as x2 + 1 > 0 for all real numbers x.
n.
11. something that is not dependent upon external conditions for existence or for its specific nature, size, etc. (opposed to relative).
12. the absolute,
a. something that is free from any restriction or condition.
b. something that is independent of some or all relations.
c. something that is perfect or complete.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin absolūtus complete, finished, unqualified, past participle of absolvere to release; see absolve]
ab`so•lute′ness, n.

absolute

Existing without depending in any way on other things; the opposite of relative.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absolute - something that is conceived or that exists independently and not in relation to other thingsabsolute - something that is conceived or that exists independently and not in relation to other things; something that does not depend on anything else and is beyond human control; something that is not relative; "no mortal being can influence the absolute"
abstract, abstraction - a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance; "he loved her only in the abstract--not in person"
Adj.1.absolute - perfect or complete or pureabsolute - perfect or complete or pure; "absolute loyalty"; "absolute silence"; "absolute truth"; "absolute alcohol"
relative, comparative - estimated by comparison; not absolute or complete; "a relative stranger"
2.absolute - complete and without restriction or qualificationabsolute - complete and without restriction or qualification; sometimes used informally as intensifiers; "absolute freedom"; "an absolute dimwit"; "a downright lie"; "out-and-out mayhem"; "an out-and-out lie"; "a rank outsider"; "many right-down vices"; "got the job through sheer persistence"; "sheer stupidity"
complete - having every necessary or normal part or component or step; "a complete meal"; "a complete wardrobe"; "a complete set of the Britannica"; "a complete set of china"; "a complete defeat"; "a complete accounting"
3.absolute - not limited by lawabsolute - not limited by law; "an absolute monarch"
arbitrary - based on or subject to individual discretion or preference or sometimes impulse or caprice; "an arbitrary decision"; "the arbitrary rule of a dictator"; "an arbitrary penalty"; "of arbitrary size and shape"; "an arbitrary choice"; "arbitrary division of the group into halves"
4.absolute - expressing finality with no implication of possible change; "an absolute guarantee to respect the nation's authority"
unequivocal, univocal, unambiguous - admitting of no doubt or misunderstanding; having only one meaning or interpretation and leading to only one conclusion; "unequivocal evidence"; "took an unequivocal position"; "an unequivocal success"; "an unequivocal promise"; "an unequivocal (or univocal) statement"
5.absolute - not capable of being violated or infringed; "infrangible human rights"
inalienable, unalienable - incapable of being repudiated or transferred to another; "endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights"

absolute

adjective
1. complete, total, perfect, entire, pure, sheer, utter, outright, thorough, downright, consummate, unqualified, full-on (informal), out-and-out, unadulterated, unmitigated, dyed-in-the-wool, thoroughgoing, unalloyed, unmixed, arrant, deep-dyed (usually derogatory) A sick person needs to have absolute trust in a doctor.
4. definite, sure, certain, positive, guaranteed, actual, assured, genuine, exact, precise, decisive, conclusive, unequivocal, unambiguous, infallible, categorical, unquestionable, dinkum (Austral & N.Z. informal) He brought the absolute proof that we needed.

absolute

adjective
1. Supremely excellent in quality or nature:
2. Free from extraneous elements:
3. Without limitations or mitigating conditions:
Translations
تَام، كَامِل
absolut
absolutníčistýjistýnaprostý
absolutfuldstændigtotal
täielikvaba
absoluuttinenehdotonehdottomanperusastepositiivi
algjör
absoliutusvisiškaivisiškas
absolūtspilnīgs
absolútny
popoln
positiv

absolute

[ˈæbsəluːt]
A. ADJ
1. (= complete, unqualified) [certainty, confidence, majority, need] → absoluto; [support] → incondicional, total; [refusal] → rotundo; [prohibition, command] → terminante; [proof] → irrefutable; [denial] → rotundo, categórico; [right] → incuestionable
he's an absolute beginneres un auténtico principiante
it's an absolute fact thates indiscutible el hecho de que ...
the divorce was made absoluteconcedieron el divorcio por sentencia firme
absolute monopolymonopolio m total
it was the absolute truth, I promiseera la pura verdad, se lo prometo
absolute vetoveto m total
2. (= unlimited) [power, monarch] → absoluto
3. (= not relative) [value] → absoluto
in absolute termsen términos absolutos
the quest for absolute truthla búsqueda de la verdad absoluta
4. (as intensifier) [liar, villain] → redomado
the party was an absolute disasterla fiesta fue un completo desastre
it's an absolute disgracees una auténtica vergüenza
it's the absolute end!¡es el colmo!
she wore an expression of absolute hatredla expresión de su cara estaba llena de odio
the man's an absolute idiotes completamente idiota
it's absolute rubbish!¡es puro disparate!
5. (Gram) → absoluto
B. N (Philos)
the absolutelo absoluto
C. CPD absolute alcohol Nalcohol m puro
absolute liability N (Fin, Jur) → responsabilidad f total
absolute pitch N (Mus) → oído m absoluto
to have absolute pitchtener oído absoluto
absolute temperature Ntemperatura f absoluta
absolute zero Ncero m absoluto

absolute

[ˈæbsəluːt]
adj
(= complete, unequivocal) [certainty, necessity] → absolu(e); [refusal, silence, confidence] → absolu(e); [proof, truth, assurance, rules] → absolu(e)
an absolute beginner → un(e) parfait(e) débutant(e)
the absolute minimum → le minimum absolu
the absolute maximum → le maximum absolu
in absolute terms → en valeurs absolues
[power, monarchy] → absolu(e); [authority] → absolu(e)
(= utter) (emphatic) [nonsense, rubbish, mess] → complet/ète
The house is an absolute mess → La maison est dans un bazar complet.
It's an absolute disgrace → C'est vraiment honteux.
nabsolu m

absolute

adjabsolut; power, monopoly, liberty, support also, commanduneingeschränkt; monarch alsounumschränkt; lie, idiotausgemacht; the absolutedas Absolute; the divorce was made absolutedie Scheidung wurde ausgesprochen

absolute

:
absolute majority
absolute pitch
nabsolute Tonhöhe; (of person)absolutes Gehör
absolute zero

absolute

[ˈæbsluːt]
1. adj (gen) → assoluto/a; (support) → totale, completo/a, senza riserve; (proof) → inconfutabile; (denial) → categorico/a; (lie) → bello/a e buono/a
he's an absolute idiot → è un perfetto idiota
it's an absolute scandal → è un autentico scandalo
2. nassoluto

absolute

(ˈӕbsəluːt) adjective
complete. absolute honesty.
ˌabsoˈlutely adverb
completely. It is absolutely impossible for me to go.

ab·so·lute

a. absoluto-a, incondicional;
___ alcohol (ethyl)alcohol ___ (alcohol etílico);
___ restreposo ___.
References in classic literature ?
They found he had absolute pitch, and a remarkable memory.
He pleased her; his absolute devotion flattered her.
His blood curdled when he found himself in absolute contact with such fierce and implacable enemies; but he so far mastered his feelings as to pursue his way into the center of the lodge, with an exterior that did not betray the weakness.
She recalled the absolute freedom of their al-fresco life in the old double cabin, when she spent the greater part of her waking hours under the mute trees in the encompassing solitude, and, half regretting the more civilized restraints of this newer and more ambitious abode, forgot that she had ever rebelled against it.
As for Clifford, an absolute palsy of fear came over him.
He was, in truth, a rare phenomenon; so perfect, in one point of view; so shallow, so delusive, so impalpable such an absolute nonentity, in every other.
He laid aside, too, all the dominant dignity and absolute sway with which he lorded it in his little empire, the school, and became wonderfully gentle and ingratiating.
I had an absolute certainty that I should see again what I had already seen, but something within me said that by offering myself bravely as the sole subject of such experience, by accepting, by inviting, by surmounting it all, I should serve as an expiatory victim and guard the tranquility of my companions.
If I had been downright honest with myself, I would have seen very plainly in my heart that I did but half fancy being committed this way to so long a voyage, without once laying my eyes on the man who was to be the absolute dictator of it, so soon as the ship sailed out upon the open sea.
But owing to the mystery of the spout --whether it be water or whether it be vapor --no absolute certainty can as yet be arrived at on this head.
Shelby both felt annoyed and degraded by the familiar impudence of the trader, and yet both saw the absolute necessity of putting a constraint on their feelings.
It is not so important that many should be good as you, as that there be some absolute goodness somewhere; for that will leaven the whole lump.