absolutism


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ab·so·lut·ism

 (ăb′sə-lo͞o′tĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A political theory holding that all power should be vested in one ruler or other authority.
b. A form of government in which all power is vested in a single ruler or other authority.
2. An absolute doctrine, principle, or standard.

ab′so·lut′ist n.
ab′so·lu·tis′tic (-lo͞o-tĭs′tĭk) adj.

absolutism

(ˈæbsəluːˌtɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of a political system in which unrestricted power is vested in a monarch, dictator, etc; despotism
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. any theory which holds that truth or moral or aesthetic value is absolute and universal and not relative to individual or social differences. Compare relativism
b. the doctrine that reality is unitary and unchanging and that change and diversity are mere illusion. See also monism2, pluralism5b
3. (Theology) Christianity an uncompromising form of the doctrine of predestination
ˈabsoˌlutist n, adj

ab•so•lut•ism

(ˈæb sə luˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or the exercise of unrestricted power in government.
2. any theory holding that values, principles, etc., are absolute and not relative, dependent, or changeable.
[1745–55]
ab′so•lut`ist, n., adj.
ab`so•lu•tis′tic, adj.

absolutism

the theory and exercise of complete and unrestricted power in government. See also autarchy, autocracy, despotism, dictatorship, monarchy, oligarchy. — absolutist, n., adj.absolutistic. adj.
See also: Government

absolutism

A political theory that all power should be in the hands of a single ruler.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absolutism - dominance through threat of punishment and violenceabsolutism - dominance through threat of punishment and violence
ascendance, ascendancy, ascendence, ascendency, dominance, control - the state that exists when one person or group has power over another; "her apparent dominance of her husband was really her attempt to make him pay attention to her"
2.absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
3.absolutism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in governmentabsolutism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in government
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
4.absolutism - the doctrine of an absolute beingabsolutism - the doctrine of an absolute being  
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school

absolutism

noun dictatorship, tyranny, totalitarianism, authoritarianism, despotism, autocracy, arbitrariness, absolute rule, absoluteness, autarchy the triumphal reassertion of royal absolutism

absolutism

noun
1. A political doctrine advocating the principle of absolute rule:
2. A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
Translations
apsolutizam
absolutismeenevelde

absolutism

[ˈæbsəluːtɪzəm] Nabsolutismo m

absolutism

[ˌæbsəˈluːtɪzəm] n
(political system)absolutisme m
(absolutist way of thinking)absolutisme m

absolutism

nAbsolutismus m

absolutism

[ˈæbsəluːˌtɪzm] n (Pol) → assolutismo
References in classic literature ?
The serf, in the period of serfdom, raised himself to membership in the commune, just as the petty bourgeois, under the yoke of feudal absolutism, managed to develop into a bourgeois.
A more complete imagination than Philip's might have pictured a youth of splendid hope, for he must have been entering upon manhood in 1848 when kings, remembering their brother of France, went about with an uneasy crick in their necks; and perhaps that passion for liberty which passed through Europe, sweeping before it what of absolutism and tyranny had reared its head during the reaction from the revolution of 1789, filled no breast with a hotter fire.
Sir Robert Walpole, ruling the country with unscrupulous absolutism, had now put an end to the employment of literary men in public life, and though Johnson's poem 'London,' a satire on the city written in imitation of the Roman poet Juvenal and published in 1738, attracted much attention, he could do no better for a time than to become one of that undistinguished herd of hand-to-mouth and nearly starving Grub Street writers whom Pope was so contemptuously abusing and who chiefly depended on the despotic patronage of magazine publishers.
And Razumov reflected that the man was simply unable to understand a reasonable adherence to the doctrine of absolutism.
Therefore, uprooting the malady of absolutism turns out to be a fight against religious uniqueness.
Which reminds us that the British people did not take kindly to living in a Commonwealth under the hereditary dictatorship of Oliver, and later his son Richard, Cromwell - Constitutional Monarchy 2 Absolutism 0).
With its opinions in Stevens, Snyder, and Brown, the Roberts Court was well poised to defend, yet again, its own variation of First Amendment absolutism.
Experts say that in this way, the absolutism is only being reinforced to the detriment of the democracy.
The cases passing through this courtroom demonstrate we are paying a high cost in increased crime and other social ills for moving away from moral absolutism [like the Ten Commandments] to moral relativism .
In this essay I will show, however, that given some significant misgivings about codes of ethics and some underlying pitfalls of the ethical (or moral) doctrines of absolutism and relativism, (2) religious culture cannot hope to do right things by appealing to ethical codes (where doing right is simply a matter of applying the right ethical rule).
In his new book, Expansion and Crisis in Louis XIV's France, Darryl Dee sets out to analyze the paradigm and the local experience of absolutism in one case study, the border province of Franche-Comte, from the French conquest in 1674 to the death of the Sun King in 1715.
They are resisting patriarchal control of their own lives, which is a threat to hierarchical absolutism in general.