absolutive


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ab·so·lu·tive

 (ăb′sə-lo͞o′tĭv)
adj.
In ergative languages, of or relating to the grammatical case of the subject of an intransitive verb and the object of a transitive verb.
n.
1. The absolutive case.
2. An absolutive inflection.
3. A nominal having an absolutive form.

absolutive

(ˈæbsəˌluːtɪv)
n
the grammatical case in an ergative language that is used for the direct object of a transitive verb and the subject of an intransitive verb
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
the Tibetan is more likely to reflect the absolutive parijnaya (Uv[, SHT]) than the ablative-parijnanat (CPSu, SBhV).
Happen is represented as having the valency of an absolutive (or neutral) functor and a locative.
The inventory of grammatical cases of the Tsezic languages typically includes the Absolutive, the Ergative, the Instrumental and the first and second Genitive.
In a recent publication I have argued that these forms correspond to dative-shift, in which the logical patient is demoted to the essive and the recipient or beneficiary of the action is raised to the absolutive (see Campbell, "Agent, Subject, Patient, and Beneficiary: Grammatical Roles in Hurrian," in Grammatical Case in the Languages of the Middle East and Europe, ed.
Absolutive: Absolutive is a term used in grammatical description of languages, which has an ergative system.
That is, it is a non-auxiliary verb ({P:N}) which takes an ergative (agentive), absolutive (neutral) and a locative as complements, with this complementation being specified to the right of the slash in (6).
The ergative NP may exhibit some of these properties (usually semantic), while the absolutive NP may exhibit others (usually syntactic).
So, for instance, a language in which pronominal objects are marked accusative, and nominal objects absolutive, will include a subhierarchy like (20).
While accepting that features of OIA such as retroflexes, the quotation end-marker iti, and even the morphology of the gerunds could have developed without influence from another language family, he argues that as absolutive constructions increase in frequency they gradually develop syntactical features that conform to Dravidian patterns.
The word meaning 'fish' is in the absolutive case (unmarked in this language) when it is the "subject" of an intransitive verb (first example) or the "object" of a transitive verb (third example), and in the ergative case when it is the "subject" of a transitive verb (second example).
65: Among the absolutive plural endings, Wegner adds =as.
The following abbreviations are used in the glosses: ABL ablative, ABS absolutive, ACC accusative, AOR aorist, ASSERT assertion, A:DCL affirmative declarative, COMP complementizer, COP copula, DAT dative, EMPH emphatic, ERG ergative, F future, FREQ frequentative, INF infinitive, IPF imperfective, IRR irrealis, KINPOSS kin possessive, LOC locative, NEG negative, NOM nominative, OPT optative, PC past completive, PER periphrasis form, PF perfective, PL plural, POSS possessive, PRF perfect, PROP proprietive, PST past, PTP participle, PURP purposive, QUOT quotation, SBST substantivizer, SG singular, SRSS superessive, and SUG suggestive.