absolved


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ab·solve

 (əb-zŏlv′, -sŏlv′)
tr.v. ab·solved, ab·solv·ing, ab·solves
1. To pronounce clear of guilt or blame.
2. To relieve of a requirement or obligation.
3.
a. To grant a remission of sin to.
b. To pardon or remit (a sin).

[Middle English absolven, from Latin absolvere; see absolute.]

ab·solv′a·ble adj.
ab·solv′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.absolved - freed from any question of guiltabsolved - freed from any question of guilt; "is absolved from all blame"; "was now clear of the charge of cowardice"; "his official honor is vindicated"
clean-handed, guiltless, innocent - free from evil or guilt; "an innocent child"; "the principle that one is innocent until proved guilty"
References in classic literature ?
If all the world hated you, and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved you, and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends.
He told how, long since in Palestine, a deadly feud arose between the tribe of Benjamin and the rest of the Israelitish nation; and how they cut to pieces wellnigh all the chivalry of that tribe; and how they swore by our blessed Lady, that they would not permit those who remained to marry in their lineage; and how they became grieved for their vow, and sent to consult his holiness the Pope how they might be absolved from it; and how, by the advice of the Holy Father, the youth of the tribe of Benjamin carried off from a superb tournament all the ladies who were there present, and thus won them wives without the consent either of their brides or their brides' families.
Nay, more if you all agree, later you are absolved from the promise.
And remember, moreover, that it is often he who comes off victorious from the strife, absolved of all crime in the eyes of the world.
First of all, let me tell you that poor Gorshkov has been entirely absolved of guilt.
In the meantime, however, a party of young braves, who considered them absolved by his distrust from all scruples of honor, made a circuit privately, and dashed into his encampment.
I saw him give a quick, covert glance all round my room; he marked its narrow limits, its scanty furniture: in an instant he had comprehended the state of matters--had absolved me from the crime of prosperity.
But in all contracts, if one party fail to perform his share of the compact, is not the other virtually absolved from his liability?
Therese, with her hands still meekly folded about her waist, had mastered the feelings of anger so unbecoming to a person whose sins had been absolved only about three hours before, and asked me with an insinuating softness whether she wasn't an honest girl enough to look after any old lady belonging to a world which after all was sinful.
The next night there happened a similar accident with a similar result; and then the next -- and then again the next; so that, in the end, the good monarch, having been unavoidably deprived of all opportunity to keep his vow during a period of no less than one thousand and one nights, either forgets it altogether by the expiration of this time, or gets himself absolved of it in the regular way, or (what is more probable) breaks it outright, as well as the head of his father confessor.
And yet," said I, smiling, "I cannot quite hold myself absolved from the charge of sensationalism which has been urged against my records.
We, therefore, the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by the Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do.