abstentionist


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abstentionist

(æbˈstɛnʃənɪst)
n
a person who practises or advocates abstention or abstentionism
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
CUTS to the salaries of abstentionist MPs should be considered if the wages of MLAs are slashed, it was claimed yesterday.
People knew that we were abstentionist MPs, they have elected us to represent them but not to take our seats.
With Sinn Fein insisting its century-old Westminster abstentionist policy will remain, the DUP claims it is best placed to exert influence in any hung parliament.
By distancing himself from La ronda's abstentionist attitude towards politics, Soffici rewrites the agenda for the modernist intellectual in the post-war years, by reworking the legacy of the avant-garde experience and rethinking the relationship between art and politics.
As a sign of the differences in the BC movement, the executive of the SPC protested the abstentionist policy of the provincial CCF in such important working-class struggles.
Thus, many authors have reached a disturbing conclusion in the context of abstentionist models: No rational voter votes in elections with a very large number of voters, as the expected benefit is strictly lower than the cost involved in going out to vote.
Canada's abstentionist position was motivated, they added, by fear of losing EU support for ICAO continuing to be based in Montreal, given Singapore's push to move ICAO to Asia.
Adrian Merritt, 'The historical role of law in the regulation of employment: Abstentionist or interventionist?
For its part, the Nationalist Party bent its abstentionist policy to find ways to advance Marcantonio's electoral chances.
Through John and William Dillon, sons of his former colleague on The Nation, John Blake Dillon, who organised a 2,000 [pounds sterling] testimonial for him, he was drawn back into Irish politics, standing (unsuccessfully) for election as an abstentionist independent nationalist candidate for Cork in 1874 and successfully in February 1875.
However, the five Sinn Fein members of Parliament, who won seats in the last election, follow an abstentionist policy in which they refuse to take their seats, although they do maintain offices and perform constituency services.
By using the reasoning that the intention of parliament could not be to ruin employers, the Court ruled against the baker's claim and commenced its interpretation of the Act of 1896 with an abstentionist policy.