abstinence


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ab·sti·nence

 (ăb′stə-nəns)
n.
The act or practice of refraining from indulging an appetite or desire, especially for alcoholic drink or sexual intercourse.

[Middle English, from Old French abstenance, from Latin abstinentia, from abstinēns, abstinent-, present participle of abstinēre, to hold back; see abstain.]

ab′sti·nent adj.
ab′sti·nent·ly adv.
Synonyms: abstinence, self-denial, temperance, sobriety, continence
These nouns refer to the habitual refusal to indulge a desire, especially a sensual one. Abstinence implies the willful avoidance of pleasures, especially of food and drink, thought to be harmful or self-indulgent: "I vainly reminded him of his protracted abstinence from food" (Emily Brontë).
Self-denial suggests resisting one's own desires for the achievement of a higher goal: "For too many people, the result of sedentary living is a perennial, losing battle against the bulge: bursts of self-denial interspersed with guilt when self-denial inevitably leads to self-indulgence" (Jane Brody).
Temperance refers to moderation and self-restraint and sobriety to gravity in bearing, manner, or treatment; both nouns denote moderation in or abstinence from consuming alcohol: Teetotalers preach temperance for everyone. "[T]hose moments which would come between the subsidence of actual sobriety and the commencement of intoxication" (Anthony Trollope).
Continence specifically refers to abstaining from sexual activity: The nun took a vow of continence.

abstinence

(ˈæbstɪnəns)
n
1. the act or practice of refraining from some action or from the use of something, esp alcohol
2. (Roman Catholic Church) chiefly RC Church the practice of refraining from specific kinds of food or drink, esp from meat, as an act of penance
[C13: via Old French from Latin abstinentia, from abstinēre to abstain]
ˈabstinent adj
ˈabstinently adv

ab•sti•nence

(ˈæb stə nəns)

also ab′sti•nen•cy,



n.
1. forbearance from indulgence of an appetite.
2. abstention from a drug, as alcohol or heroin, esp. a drug on which one is dependent.
3. the refraining from certain kinds of foods on certain days, as from meat during Lent.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin abstinentia. See abstain, -ence]
ab′sti•nent, adj.
ab′sti•nent•ly, adv.

abstinence

a voluntary and habitual self-deprivation, especially from alcoholic beverages. — abstinent, adj.
See also: Alcohol
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abstinence - the trait of abstaining (especially from alcohol)abstinence - the trait of abstaining (especially from alcohol)
self-denial, self-discipline - the trait of practicing self discipline
2.abstinence - act or practice of refraining from indulging an appetite
chastity, sexual abstention, celibacy - abstaining from sexual relations (as because of religious vows)
self-control, self-denial, self-discipline - the act of denying yourself; controlling your impulses
temperance, sobriety - abstaining from excess
teetotaling, teetotalism - abstaining from alcohol
fast, fasting - abstaining from food
inhibition, suppression - (psychology) the conscious exclusion of unacceptable thoughts or desires
sawm - the third pillar of Islam is fasting (primarily during the month of Ramadan); Muslims abstain from food and drink and gambling and all sensuous pleasures from sunrise to sunset during Ramadan

abstinence

noun abstention, continence, temperance, self-denial, self-restraint, forbearance, refraining, avoidance, moderation, sobriety, asceticism, teetotalism, abstemiousness, soberness six months of abstinence
abandon, excess, indulgence, self-indulgence, gluttony, acquisitiveness, wantonness, covetousness, greediness
Quotations
"Refrain to-night, And that shall lend a kind of easiness To the next abstinence: the next more easy; For use almost can change the stamp of nature" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]
"Abstinence is as easy to me, as temperance would be difficult" [Samuel Johnson Correspondence with Mrs. Hannah More]
"To many, total abstinence is easier than perfect moderation" [St. Augustine of Hippo On the Good of Marriage]

abstinence

noun
The practice of refraining from use of alcoholic liquors:
Translations
إمْتِنَاع عَن تَنَاوُل الكُحُول
abstinencezdrženlivost
afholdenhed
absztinencia
bindindi
abstinencijaabstinencijos simptomaipradėti nebevartoti alkoholiopradėti nebevartoti narkotikų
abstinenceatturešanasatturība
abstinencia
bırakmasakınmauzak durma

abstinence

[ˈæbstɪnəns]
A. Nabstinencia f (from de) total abstinenceabstinencia f total (esp de bebidas alcohólicas)
B. CPD abstinence syndrome Nsíndrome m de abstinencia

abstinence

[ˈæbstɪnəns] nabstinence f
sexual abstinence → abstinence sexuelle
abstinence from sth [+ alcohol, drinking] → abstention de qch; [+ sex] → abstinence de qch; [+ meat] → abstention de qch
total abstinence from alcohol → abstention complète de boissons alcoolisées

abstinence

nAbstinenz f(from von), Enthaltung f(from von); (= self-restraint)Enthaltsamkeit f; total abstinencevöllige Abstinenz; years of abstinencejahrelange Abstinenz

abstinence

[ˈæbstɪnəns] nastinenza

abstinence

(ˈӕbstinəns) noun
1. the act or habit of abstaining, especially from alcohol.
2. withdrawal from taking alcohol or addictive drugs. He is in heroin abstinence.
go into abstinence
to start a process of withdrawal from addiction. She went into an alcohol abstinence programme.
symptoms of abstinence
unpleasant physical symptoms such as headaches and nausea, resulting from abstinence.

ab·sti·nence

n. abstinencia, privación voluntaria, templanza, moderación.

abstinence

n abstinencia
References in classic literature ?
I give you leave," returned Laurie, who enjoyed having someone to tease, after his long abstinence from his favorite pastime.
This abstinence, so remarkable in an Indian, when he possessed the means of satisfying hunger, at length attracted the notice of Heyward.
But I may as well say --en passant, as the French remark --that I myself --that is to say, Jack Bunger, late of the reverend clergy --am a strict total abstinence man; I never drink-- Water
It was one anchorite's pride to lie naked in the mud and let the insects bite him and blister him unmolested; it was another's to lean against a rock, all day long, conspicuous to the admiration of the throng of pilgrims and pray; it was another's to go naked and crawl around on all fours; it was another's to drag about with him, year in and year out, eighty pounds of iron; it was another's to never lie down when he slept, but to stand among the thorn-bushes and snore when there were pilgrims around to look; a woman, who had the white hair of age, and no other apparel, was black from crown to heel with forty-seven years of holy abstinence from water.
I vainly reminded him of his protracted abstinence from food: if he stirred to touch anything in compliance with my entreaties, if he stretched his hand out to get a piece of bread, his fingers clenched before they reached it, and remained on the table, forgetful of their aim.
He had no further intercourse with Spirits, but lived upon the Total Abstinence Principle, ever afterwards; and it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge.
Pumblechook, sighing and nodding his head several times, as if he might have expected that, and as if abstinence from watercresses were consistent with my downfall.
Bold deed thou hast presum'd, adventrous EVE, And peril great provok't, who thus hast dar'd Had it bin onely coveting to Eye That sacred Fruit, sacred to abstinence, Much more to taste it under banne to touch.
Having dispelled the cold, he turned eagerly to the smoking mess which was placed before him, and ate with a haste and an apparent relish, that seemed to betoken long abstinence from food.
But all I ask is the ninepence, and let the lady keep the one and threppence as the reward of abstinence.
But the success has not hitherto been answerable, partly by some error in the QUANTUM or composition, and partly by the perverseness of lads, to whom this bolus is so nauseous, that they generally steal aside, and discharge it upwards, before it can operate; neither have they been yet persuaded to use so long an abstinence, as the prescription requires.
Hence, up to the date of the introduction of the Universal Colour Bill, the Circles had not only held their own, but even increased their lead of the other classes by abstinence from the popular fashion.