abstinent


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to abstinent: absinthe

ab·sti·nence

 (ăb′stə-nəns)
n.
The act or practice of refraining from indulging an appetite or desire, especially for alcoholic drink or sexual intercourse.

[Middle English, from Old French abstenance, from Latin abstinentia, from abstinēns, abstinent-, present participle of abstinēre, to hold back; see abstain.]

ab′sti·nent adj.
ab′sti·nent·ly adv.
Synonyms: abstinence, self-denial, temperance, sobriety, continence
These nouns refer to the habitual refusal to indulge a desire, especially a sensual one. Abstinence implies the willful avoidance of pleasures, especially of food and drink, thought to be harmful or self-indulgent: "I vainly reminded him of his protracted abstinence from food" (Emily Brontë).
Self-denial suggests resisting one's own desires for the achievement of a higher goal: "For too many people, the result of sedentary living is a perennial, losing battle against the bulge: bursts of self-denial interspersed with guilt when self-denial inevitably leads to self-indulgence" (Jane Brody).
Temperance refers to moderation and self-restraint and sobriety to gravity in bearing, manner, or treatment; both nouns denote moderation in or abstinence from consuming alcohol: Teetotalers preach temperance for everyone. "[T]hose moments which would come between the subsidence of actual sobriety and the commencement of intoxication" (Anthony Trollope).
Continence specifically refers to abstaining from sexual activity: The nun took a vow of continence.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abstinent - a person who refrains from drinking intoxicating beveragesabstinent - a person who refrains from drinking intoxicating beverages
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
teetotaler, teetotalist, teetotaller - a total abstainer
Adj.1.abstinent - self-restraining; not indulging an appetite especially for food or drink; "not totally abstinent but abstemious"
abstemious - sparing in consumption of especially food and drink; "the pleasures of the table, never of much consequence to one naturally abstemious"- John Galsworthy
Translations
abstinent

abstinent

[ˈæbstɪnənt] ADJabstinente

abstinent

adjabstinent (geh), → enthaltsam

abstinent

[ˈæbstɪnənt] adjastinente
References in periodicals archive ?
Both acamprosate and naltrexone reduce craving for alcohol, and studies show that patients who relapse and fail to be totally abstinent while on these drugs still drink a lot less--which presumably means fewer adverse consequences.
All but 29 participants exhibited one of four different quitting behaviors: 99 subjects never abstained; 44 were only abstinent at the two-week assessment; 33 managed to remain smoke-free at the two- and eight-week checkups; 33 managed to stay off cigarettes for the entire study length.
For the substance abusing patient who may have some other psychiatric condition, it is best to wait until the patient is abstinent for some time before making a definitive diagnosis--but without proper treatment, few can get sober, said Dr.
3 percent of the intervention group were abstinent from the drug, compared with 16.
The participants who received the bupropion were twice as likely to be abstinent as those receiving placebo.
The athletes will encourage students to make a commitment to sexual purity by remaining abstinent until marriage.
It looks to us that XR-NTX can help people remain abstinent by reducing the importance of these cues so they are less likely to relapse.
And the percentage of days abstinent increased from 22% at baseline to 44% at 12 weeks in the topiramate group, and decreased from 26% to 18% in the placebo group.
Also, a 2003 study from the journal Adolescent & Family Health found that the decrease in teen birth rates was due to an increase in the number of abstinent teens, not increased condom use.
Maintaining abstinence was even more difficult for teens than it is for adults, however: only 8 percent of teens on both medications and 7 percent of teens on the patch plus placebo were still abstinent after 26 weeks.
In a recent study, 70 percent of women had stopped smoking at the end of the 12-week program, but after one year, only 27 percent remained abstinent.
Turns out, that if people were abstinent in week 1, the likelihood they would be abstinent at weeks 9-12 was 49%, "essentially a coin flip," he said.